News: Reduce Holiday Stress, Remedy Insomnia, Save Money

holiday stress‘Tis the season for holiday stress. From last minute shopping, to getting less sleep, to making ends meet financially, to consuming more sweets and drinks at holiday get-togethers.

Americans are faced with many more physical and emotional pressures during the holidays. Recent research studies and surveys in the areas of sleep, eating, and finances are shedding some light on actions one can take to lessen the stress load.

The market research firm Harris Interactive recently conducted a “Holiday Stress Index” study. The poll was based on a nationwide sample of 2,173 adults in the U.S. eighteen years and over. Ninety percent of the respondents said they experience some level of stress and/or anxiety about the holiday season. However this year, more than a third (38 percent) said they expect to feel more stress and anxiety in this holiday season due to the current economy.

One interesting aspect of this study is that people feel there is too much emphasis on gift giving and not enough on communication and connection with loved-ones. The study indicates that, given a choice, most people would prefer having good family relationships as opposed to gifts or material goods. Here are some ideas: If the wallet or purse isn’t full enough, write a poem for someone and frame it, bake something special, or give gift certificates for outings, walks, or simple things a friend or family member enjoys.

For those who love food yet want to watch their calories, a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that people who rapidly bolt down their food are more likely to overeat than those who dine at a more leisurely rate. The scientists discovered that rapid eating stops the release of a hormone that tells the brain when the stomach is full.

On one day of the new study, volunteers wolfed down 2 1/2 scoops of ice cream in five minutes flat. On another, they made the treat last for 30 minutes. The Athens University scientists measured blood levels of two types of appetite-lowering hormones before and after, and discovered that when people savored their ice cream very slowly, the appetite-suppressant hormone levels were 25 percent to 30 percent higher. Enjoy those holiday parties – just take time with eating and chew, chew, chew.

Financial stress is causing Americans to lose sleep this holiday season. According to a recent study done by SleepBetter, almost half of the nation’s moms and dads (44%) say they are worried about being able to afford the holidays this year, with one in six Americans (17%) expecting to lose sleep due to holiday-induced stress.

Not only do the anxieties and excitement of the season have an impact on many people’s ability to fall asleep, but added obligations and busyness at this time of year mean trying to fit more into our days and nights. To sleep well, SleepBetter recommends keeping one’s regular sleep schedule as best as possible during the holidays, and going to bed and getting up the same time as usual. In addition, while alcohol may help with falling asleep, it will interfere with the quality of sleep during the night as it creates a lighter, less sound sleep.

Calcium is directly related to the cycles of sleep. One study found that calcium levels were higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. Calcium is one of the few minerals that acts as a natural sedative, because it causes the release of the sleep-inducing amino acid tryptophan.

The science-based nutritionist Adelle Davis says: “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the thousands of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Calcium should be taken with magnesium in a 2 to 1 ratio, meaning twice as much calcium as magnesium.

Good nutrition can help stabilize the effects of eating sugary or fattening holiday foods. Eat fresh vegetables and fruits daily, drink lots of water, do some walking daily, and take nutritional supplements.  One supplement example is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This natural sleep remedy contains highly absorbable, quick acting forms of calcium and magnesium

Sleep Minerals II helps to calm anxiety and insomnia. It also contains vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says: “Due to some stressful issues in my life, I was prescribed sleeping drugs to take. I had become dependent on the medication and couldn’t sleep without it. Now I take the Sleep Minerals before bed and I can sleep through the night without drugs. I’m also able to easily fall back to sleep if I do have to get up. Another benefit is this helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

Here’s to a healthful holiday season for all. And to one with holiday stress conquered, good sleep enjoyed, money saved, and happy conversations with family and friends!

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this info page.

Proven Natural Remedies for Sinuses, Colds and Flus

Greetings,

There’s a couple of great charts below that show some of the most famous and effective remedies for sinuses, infections, and colds.

For example, garlic is a commonly used cold medicine. It is widely used in Russia and is known there as “Russian Penicillin”. 

Garlic supports immune function and it can kill bacteria, parasites, fungus and the flu virus. One test-tube study showed that fresh garlic kills various viruses, including one which can cause flu like symptoms.   

Horseradish is another plant that can ease throat and upper respiratory tract infections.  It has been shown specifically to destroy the flu virus and reduce the severity of flu infections in animals. This plant is a member of the mustard family.

You may have found that eating horseradish can make your eyes water and nose run.  Indeed, it can create a similar release of watery fluids inside the bronchial passages of the lungs which helps to flush them out and wash away congestion.  

Vitamin C is one of the most famous boosts to immunity and one of the best remedies for sinuses and discomfort.  In addition to enhancing the activity of immune cells, vitamin C acts as a vital component in the production of collagen, the principal protein found in all connective tissues. 

By helping to maintain the strength and integrity of connective tissue structures, vitamin C keeps infections from spreading throughout the body (from the Handbook of Vitamins).

Enjoy the charts and here’s to your good health!remedies for sinusesThese charts are shared courtesy of Oransi.com

This natural health news is presented by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D.

Sleep Minerals II may also be one of the good remedies for sinuses and colds.  Calcium can lower fever and zinc accelerates the growth of immune cells while preventing the replication of cold-causing viruses.  In one study where people with colds were given zinc lozenges, sore throats disappeared after 1 day versus 3 days in the placebo group, nasal drainage in 4 days (versus 7 days), and headache in 2 days (versus 3 days).

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

Sleep Foods: Almonds Contain Melatonin and Magnesium for Better Sleep

sleep foodsIn the quest for a good, restful night’s sleep with less tossing and turning, people are reaching out to learn more about natural sleep aids and sleep-inducing foods.

At the top of many sleep foods lists are almonds – a healthy food that’s high in two of the best-known sleep substances – magnesium and melatonin.

Melatonin is a hormone that’s produced by a gland located in the center of the brain. At night or in the dark, this gland naturally releases melatonin to regulate the sleep cycle. A recent study appeared in the journal Nutrients called Dietary Sources of Melatonin.

The researchers in this study say that in the realm of plant foods, nuts contain the highest amount of melatonin.  Almonds, walnuts and pistachios have good amounts of it.  The study goes on to say it’s a proven fact that melatonin concentration in human blood can significantly increase after a person eats some melatonin-containing food.

Almonds are a special nut as they contain the highest magnesium levels. One ounce of almonds, which is about a handful or 23 nuts, contains 80 milligrams of magnesium.  This is 20% of the suggested daily value of 400 milligrams.

Magnesium has the ability to promote sleep and this is thought to be linked to its actions in lessening inflammation in the body.  In a study from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran, research was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia. Taking two magnesium tablets twice a day resulted in significant increases in sleep duration and reduced cortisol levels in the body.  Cortisol is a stress hormone made by the adrenal glands that can keep people awake.

A study on almonds as a sleep food for animals was reported in the Journal of Natural Medicine.  A water-based extract of almonds was used in the study.  With the almond extract, the scientists observed a significant prolongation of total sleeping time as well as significant increases in the deepest levels of sleep. The results suggest that a water-based extract of almond has significant sedative effects, which may support its therapeutic use for insomnia.

To increase magnesium in one’s diet, almonds can be eaten as a snack before bedtime and may also be used in any recipe that calls for walnuts, pecans or other nuts.  Some ideas are to include them in granola mixtures, baked goods, fruit salads, vegetables and yogurt.  Soaking raw almonds in a bowl of water overnight and drying them in the oven at low heat is known to increase their nutritional value and help with digestion, however this isn’t necessary in order to enjoy their benefits.

One magnesium-based supplement shown to be effective for insomnia is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This formula contains highly absorbable forms of magnesium and calcium, which are the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for menopause insomnia, teenage insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.

Sleep Minerals II also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals II – I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

A healthy plan for good sleep is to make good use of magnesium-rich foods such as almonds and also include an effective magnesium and calcium supplement for natural relief of sleeplessness.

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

Comparing Magnesium and Melatonin as Natural Sleep Aids

 

magnesium and melatonin as a natural sleep aid

Photo courtesy of HollywoodHomestead.com

Is magnesium better than melatonin for sleep? Magnesium has many benefits for good health, one of them being its action as an effective natural sleep aid.

Melatonin supplements are also used as a sleep remedy.  These two ingredients have different qualities, different health effects, and different possible side effects. 

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients magnesium and calcium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.”

In contrast with mineral supplements, melatonin is a hormone which is produced by the pineal gland, located in the center of the brain. At night or in the dark, the pineal gland naturally releases melatonin to regulate the sleep cycle.

The body produces less melatonin with advancing age and while melatonin doesn’t require a prescription, it’s a potent hormone. It can help with sleeplessness. If too much is taken, it can result in grogginess, dizziness, stomach  cramps and make it more difficult to wake up in the morning.

Is it better to take magnesium at night?  One of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is chronic insomnia, accompanied with with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep, per a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.  Another study from the Human Nutrition Research Center found that a magnesium citrate supplement increased sleep quality in adults aged 51 to 85.

Magnesium has hundreds of health effects in the body. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center web site, inadequate magnesium appears to reduce serotonin levels in the brain.  One study found that magnesium was just as effective as an antidepressant drug in treating depression. 

In addition, researchers at Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute reported that for every 100 milligram increase in magnesium intake, the risk of developing type-2 diabetes decreased by 15 per cent.  Other studies have shown that people with migraine headaches have low concentrations of magnesium in their body.

Mildred Seelig, M.D., the leading medical researcher on magnesium says: “Many people needlessly suffer pain – including … migraines and muscle cramps – because they don’t get enough magnesium.”

Which form of magnesium is best for sleep?  A recent study on magnesium for sleep came from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Its subjects were 46 older adults, aged 60 to 75, who were experiencing insomnia. However, it’s interesting to note that the researchers recommend their results be extended to all ages of the general population as helpful advice.

In the University study, the subjects were divided into two groups. One group received placebos, while the other received magnesium oxide tablets twice a day (250 milligrams each) for eight weeks. In the group that was given magnesium, the subjects experienced significant increases in sleep time and sleep efficiency (which is the time spent in bed vs the time spent sleeping).  They also had less night time interruptions and fewer early morning awakenings. Magnesium citrate is another form that has been proven helpful for better sleep.

One possible side effect from taking too much magnesium is that the bowels may become too loose or stomach discomfort can occur — at which point less can be taken. If this side effect happens, magnesium should be taken with a full meal or a healthy snack. 

Another important nutritional tip that can help to avoid any deficiencies is to balance magnesium with calcium and vitamin D rather than taking it alone.  The recommended ratio is 2 to 1 or twice as much calcium as magnesium.

According to the Mayo Clinic, possible side effects of melatonin include stomach cramps, anxiety, irritability, confusion and short-term depression.  Melatonin supplements can interact with various medications such as blood-thinning medications, medications that suppress the immune system, diabetes medications and birth control pills.  Prolonged use may also inhibit the body’s own natural ability to produce melatonin.

This health news is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs and their natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II is the original magnesium and calcium based remedy and is known for soothing even the worst, long-term insomnia.  It also contains vitamin D and zinc and helps everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to older seniors, to get a good night’s sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals. I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this page.

Is magnesium better than melatonin for sleep?

James F. Balch, M.D. writes: “A lack of the nutrients magnesium and calcium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.” Magnesium is also beneficial for bone health and heart health. Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland in the brain. According to WebMD, melatonin side effects may include headache, depression, daytime sleepiness, dizziness, stomach cramps and irritability.

Is it better to take magnesium at night? 

One of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is chronic insomnia accompanied with with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep, per a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

Which form of magnesium is best for sleep?

A recent study on magnesium comes from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Its subjects were 46 older adults who were experiencing insomnia. One group received placebos while the other received magnesium oxide tablets twice a day for eight weeks. Those taking the magnesium experienced significant increases in sleep time with less night time interruptions. Another good form of magnesium for sleep is magnesium citrate.

Nutrition Breakthroughs Reveals Hot Flash Remedies, Causes

hot flash remediesHot flash remedies are in high demand for women.  A hot flash, also called a hot flush, is a sudden unexpected feeling of warmth and often a breakout of sweating in the upper half of the body.

A night sweat is a “hot flash” that occurs in the night, often while one is sleeping. These flashes are experienced by 80% of women around the time of menopause, and men can also have them due to a lessening of testosterone in middle age.

At night time while a woman sleeps, her body temperature rises steeply just prior to a hot flash, and may cause her to wake up.  The National Sleep Foundation writes that as many as 61% of post-menopausal women report having symptoms of insomnia and less satisfying sleep, due in part to hot flashes interrupting their sleep with frequent awakenings.

Dr. John R. Lee, M.D. explains the source of hot flashes in his book: “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Menopause”. There is an area of the brain that controls the amounts of estrogen and progesterone made by the ovaries. When these two hormones become depleted as in menopause, the brain sends out signals for the ovaries to make more hormones, but they no longer respond to these prompts.

The signaling system can go awry as the brain sends out more and more signals and actually begins to “shout”.  This over-activity begins to affect adjacent areas of the brain; particularly the area that controls body temperature and sweating mechanisms — thus the occurrence of hot flashes.

Sometimes spicy food, hot beverages, caffeine, alcohol or cigarettes can bring on a hot flash. For help with night sweats in bed, keep the bedroom cool and keep a washcloth in a bowl of ice near the bed to use on the forehead or chest as needed. To minimize hot flashes during the summer weather, stay cool by using fans and drinking cold drinks. Keep air conditioners on and make sure that air is circulating throughout the room. Dress in layers so you can peel them off as needed.

Vitamins E and C have been shown in studies to help reduce hot flashes.  One study supporting vitamin E was published in “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” and concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes. Extensive research indicates that vitamin C strengthens blood vessels and acts as a potent health enhancement. In a study that combined vitamin C with bioflavonoids (the white matter on the inside of orange peels), 67% of the subjects reported complete relief from hot flashes.

The minerals calcium and magnesium can also help with deeper, sounder sleep and are hot flash remedies, particularly because estrogen in women and testosterone in men helps to keep these minerals in circulation in the body, and when these hormones are depleted, more frequent mineral supplementation is needed.

Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs is an example of a natural insomnia remedy that provides good results for menopause symptoms. It contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.

The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from hot flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie from Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired. My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and took them and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

How to Remedy Insomnia and Hot Flashes in Menopause

This article reveals several proven natural remedies for insomnia in menopause, as well as those that work for hot flashes and night sweats.

The North American Menopause Society reports that an estimated 6,000 U.S. women reach menopause each day, which translates to over 2 million women every year.

The Women’s Health Initiative study, which followed 16,608 women being given hormone replacement therapy in menopause, discovered a high risk of heart disease and stroke from the use of these drugs. As a result, more and more women today are seeking the use of natural remedies for menopause symptoms such as insomnia and sleeplessness, hot flashes, night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

Vitamin E is famous for it’s health benefits to glands and organs, howevervitamin e foods it may not be generally known that vitamin E is a proven remedy for hot flashes. Adelle Davis, the first nutritionist to base her recommendations on science-based studies, says:

“During the menopause the need for vitamin E soars ten to fifty times over that previously required. Hot flashes and night sweats often disappear when 50 to 500 units of vitamin E are taken daily, but they quickly recur should the vitamin be stopped.”

One study supporting vitamin E comes from the University of Iran, published in Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation. 400 IU of vitamin E in a softgel cap was given to the participants daily for four weeks. A diary was used to measure hot flashes before the study and at the end. The researchers concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Another natural remedy has been making headlines lately. Mayo Clinic breast health specialist Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., conducted a study on flaxseed for hot flashes.

The 29 participants in this clinical trial were women with hot flashes who did not want to take estrogen because of an increased risk of breast cancer. The study gave them six weeks of flaxseed therapy, consisting of 40 grams of crushed flaxseed eaten daily.

The result was that the frequency of hot flashes decreased fifty percent. Participants also reported improvements in mood, joint or muscle pain, chills, and sweating. This was a significant improvement in their health and quality of life. Dr. Pruthi said: “We hope to find more effective non-hormonal options to assist women, and flaxseed looks promising.”

Night sweats and hot flashes can become a form of insomnia in which a woman wakes up drenched in sweat and unable to sleep. Regarding mineral deficiency at the time of menopause, nutritionist Adelle Davis says:

Magnesium can also balance hormones and remedy insomnia and hot flashes.  One example is a study from the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System. Women with at least 14 hot flashes a week received 400 milligrams of magnesium oxide daily for 4 weeks, increasing to 800 mg. per day if needed.  At the end of the study, the magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes from 52 to 28 per week, which is a 41% reduction. Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

There is also an emerging link between estrogen decline, menopause symptoms and magnesium deficiency. Mildred Seeling, M.D. describes this in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

She says “Estrogen enhances magnesium utilization and its uptake by the soft tissues and bone, and may explain the resistance of young women to heart disease and osteoporosis — as well as the increased prevalence of these diseases when estrogen production ceases.”

Magnesium works best when it’s balanced with calcium in a two to one ratio. Dr. Seeling says: “The Cal/Mag ratio of two to one (twice as much calcium as magnesium) has long been considered physiologic (for healthy cells) and best for normal functioning. This was confirmed on the basis of long-term metabolic studies in young men and women done by the Research Division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.”

Vitamin D is more than just a vitamin, it’s also a hormone. That means, after undergoing a couple of activation processes in the body, it binds to cells throughout the body to regulate a wide range of bodily functions.

From the journal “Medical Hypothesis” comes a research study that followed 1500 patients over a 2 year period. A consistent level of vitamin D3 was maintained in their blood over many months. This produced normal sleep in most of the participants, regardless of their type of sleep disorder, which suggests that many types of insomnia may share the same cause.

During the research, the authors discovered the presence of high concentrations of vitamin D “receiving sites” or “receptors” in those areas of the brain that are related to the onset and maintenance of sleep.

Sleep Minerals IIOne insomnia remedy becoming popular among menopausal women is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium and is effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Sleep Minerals also contains vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil, making it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Sadie D. from The Netherlands says: “I am ever so grateful that I discovered Sleep Minerals II after suffering with premenopause and now the real menopausal insomnia. I felt like I was slowly losing my mind due to the continual lack of sleep. I can’t express the relief of getting a good night’s sleep and being able to function properly.”

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals — I*m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them.  I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

Menopause has been found to be a fulfilling time of life for many women. In a recent survey sponsored by the North American Menopause Society, 51% of U.S. postmenopausal women reported being happiest and most fulfilled between the ages of 50 and 65. Menopause is an excellent time for a woman to keep her health at its peak and minimize symptoms such as night sweats and insomnia by using effective natural remedies.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

What foods help hot flashes?

Foods rich in calcium, magnesium and vitamin E are particularly helpful for hot flashes. This includes most nuts, seeds, high-quality yogurt and cheese, sardines with bones, salmon, green leafy vegetables, other green vegetables, and avocado.

What is a natural remedy for hot flashes?

Vitamin E is famous for it’s health benefits to glands and organs, however it may not be generally known that vitamin E is a proven remedy for hot flashes. Other effective natural remedies include ground flax seeds, calcium and magnesium.vitamin e hot flash remedy

What causes hot flashes?

Dr. John R. Lee, M.D. explains the source of hot flashes in his book: “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Menopause”. When the female hormones become depleted as in menopause, the brain sends out signals for the ovaries to make more hormones, but they no longer respond. The the brain begins to “shout”.  This over-activity affects adjacent areas of the brain; particularly the area that controls body temperature and sweating mechanisms — thus the occurrence of hot flashes.

What triggers hot flashes?

Sometimes spicy food, hot beverages, caffeine, alcohol or cigarettes can bring on a hot flash. For help with night sweats in bed, keep the bedroom cool and keep a washcloth in a bowl of ice near the bed to use on the forehead or chest as needed. To minimize hot flashes during the summer weather, stay cool by using fans and drinking cold drinks. Keep air conditioners on and make sure that the air is circulating throughout the room. Dress in layers so you can peel them off as needed.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Video: Top 7 Hot Flashes Remedies for Menopause

Greetings,

Menopause is a natural process when the production of female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) declines and a woman stops having her monthly periods.  It usually happens gradually between the ages of 45 and 55.

During this time, a woman can experience uncomfortable menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety, fatigue and insomnia.

Hormone replacement therapy drugs can help hot flashes, but come with many potential side effects for the heart, lungs and breasts.  As a result, more and more women today are seeking to use natural remedies.

The video below is a brief overview of some of the most proven natural remedies for hot flashes in menopause.  More details about each of these can be found in articles in the Nutrition Breakthroughs blog.  Use the search option in the top menu to learn more about them.

Make good use of these natural remedies to stay “cool as a cucumber!”

hot flashes remediesThis natural health information is shared with you by Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid that is also beneficial for hot flashes, restless leg syndrome, bone health, teenage insomnia and mineral deficiencies.

How to Increase Melatonin for Sleep Naturally with Foods

melatonin for sleepGetting a good night’s sleep is a satisfying, energizing, and vital part of a healthy life. 

However, per the National Sleep Foundation, almost six out of ten Americans report having insomnia at least a few nights a week.

This article shares some proven natural remedies for falling asleep faster, sleeping longer and enjoying a better night’s sleep.

Melatonin is a natural hormone made by a gland in the brain that helps regulate the sleep and wake cycles.  Researchers in recent studies have found that eating tropical fruits such as pineapples and bananas, as well as certain vegetables, can naturally increase melatonin in the body and help to improve sleep and remedy insomnia.

Melatonin levels start rising in the evening and go up to a peak level in the early hours of the morning, perhaps at around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m, and then it reduces.  Melatonin production also declines with increasing age. This may partially explain why some people can sleep fine for a few hours and then suddenly find themselves wide awake in the night and unable to go back to sleep.

The research study showing how tropical fruits increase melatonin was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.  Thirty healthy volunteers ate one fruit at a time, with a one-week period left between fruits. 

Significant increases in melatonin were observed after eating pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%).  The researchers made important discoveries about fruit consumption for those people with age-related melatonin deficiency symptoms such as sleeplessness and insomnia.

Eating more vegetables can increase melatonin levels in the body as well.  Ninety-four Japanese women participated in a recent study.  Half of the women ate high amounts of selected vegetables for 65 days, while the other half were told to avoid the same vegetables. 

At the end of the study, the average daily intake of melatonin from eating the vegetables was significantly higher than the non-vegetable group. Another Japanese study tracked consumption of vegetables such as tomato, pumpkin, spinach, radish, cabbage, carrot, etc., and discovered that there was 16% more melatonin in the women with the highest vegetable intake.

Supplements of synthetic melatonin are made commercially in a lab.  Because they often offer several milligrams per supplement, which is far more than the body makes naturally, common side effects of these supplements can include daytime sleepiness, dizziness, headaches, nightmares, anxiety or irritability.  Melatonin supplements are usually only recommended for short-term use as they can inhibit the body’s own ability to manufacture melatonin.

In addition to fruits and vegetables, the brain can be assisted in its melatonin production by taking calcium supplements. William Sears, M.D. writes: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.” 

It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of calcium and magnesium, that uses twice as much calcium as magnesium, is important to overall health and that these two minerals should be taken together for best results.

Digestibility and absorption are important factors in selecting the best forms of calcium and magnesium to use. For example, Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs is a natural insomnia remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of these minerals and it is effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Sleep Minerals II also contains vitamin D and zinc which are beneficial to immunity, and it’s delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil.  This creates a creamy paste inside that makes it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and it provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days of use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

Fruits, vegetables and absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium are good remedies to increase melatonin in the body and help with better sleep.  For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

What foods are high in melatonin?

Walnuts, almonds, tart cherries, tart cherry juice, nut butters, whole grains, kiwis, pineapples, bananas and oranges. Yogurt is also a good choice. Teas that help with sleep and relaxation include chamomile, lemon balm and passionflower.melatonin for sleep

Does pineapple have melatonin?

A study showing how fruits increase melatonin appeared in the Journal of Food Chemistry. 30 volunteers ate one fruit at a time. Significant increases in melatonin were observed with pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%).

 

Health Benefits of Magnesium: Good Sleep, Nerves, Heart, Bones

magnesium insomniaGreetings to you,

Some of magnesium’s proven health benefits include remedying sleeplessness and insomnia, calming the nerves, strengthening the heart, lowering blood pressure, supporting the bones, relaxing muscles and relieving headaches.

Magnesium for Sleep

Chronic insomnia is one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Sleep
in magnesium deficiency is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings.
On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was shown in a study done by the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.  Other studies have found magnesium to enhance sleep and relaxation as well.

Calcium and Sleep

Calcium is also directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep, is related to a calcium deficiency. Restoration to the normal course of sleep was achieved following the normalization of the blood calcium level.

Sleep Minerals II

This health news and the magnesium chart is shared with you by Nutrition Breakthroughs and its natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II is the original magnesium and calcium based sleep remedy and is known for soothing even the worst insomnia.  It helps everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to older seniors, to everyone in between, to get a good night’s sleep. 

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals — I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them. I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Proven Benefits of Flaxseed: Heart, Stomach, Hot Flashes, More

Flaxseed, also known as linseed, is a high fiber food that has been cultivated for thousands of years around the world. One of the main benefits of flaxseed is that its a rich source of the healthiest type of fat, known as omega 3 fatty acid.

This group of healthy fats also includes salmon, walnuts, chia seeds and sardines. Flax is a also complete protein source, containing all nine of the essential amino acids.

Research is showing that the benefits of flaxseed include preventing menopause hot flashes, lowering cholesterol, improving heart health and benefiting blood sugar levels. It also improves breast and prostate health and is known to be an effective laxative which helps with constipation by adding fiber and bulk to the intestines.

Flaxseed has been proven to have a dual effectiveness for both constipation and diarrhea.  This study on flaxseed comes from the Natural Products Research Division of a Medical College in Pakistan.  Flaxseed oil and its gel-like fiber was given orally to people and it caused a dose-dependent increase in looser bowel movements – meaning that the higher the dose, the more effective it was. The study also showed flaxseed helpful for people with diarrhea.

Mayo Clinic breast health specialist Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., recently conducted a study on crushed flaxseed for hot flashes and menopause symptoms. The women were given six weeks of flaxseed therapy, consisting of 40 grams (one and a half ounces) of crushed flaxseed eaten daily. Study participants were asked questions that were translated into their individual hot flash scores.

The result was that their frequency of hot flashes decreased by fifty percent. Participants also reported good improvements in mood, joint and muscle pain, chills, and sweating. This was a significant benefit to their health and quality of life. Dr. Pruthi said: “We are quite pleased with the improvements noted by these women in their quality of life. Not only does flaxseed seem to alleviate hot flashes, but it appears to have overall health benefits as well.”

Flaxseed may provide a way for men with high cholesterol to lower it without using drugs. The Iowa State University Nutrition and Wellness Research Center recently studied ground flaxseed for this purpose and found that it decreased cholesterol in men by around ten percent over the three month study. The men ate three tablespoons of flaxseed daily.

Flaxseed was recently studied for the improvement of blood sugar levels in a study from the “Nutrition Research” journal. In this study, overweight men and postmenopausal women who had pre-diabetes consumed ground flaxseed daily for 12 weeks. This resulted in decreased glucose and insulin levels and also an improved insulin sensitivity in the participants. Having a better insulin sensitivity is healthier as this allows the body to utilize sugar in the blood more effectively.

Flaxseeds are available as whole seeds, ground seeds and flax seed oil. The ground seeds may be the healthiest option as they contain the most protein and fiber. Flaxseeds blend well into many foods, such as smoothies, hot and cold cereals, can be sprinkled on salads or hot vegetables, and even used in home-baked goods like muffins. The seeds are best stored in the refrigerator to preserve their benefits. Most of the studies on flaxseed used one tablespoon per day. 

This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a provider of nutrition articles and effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Besides being an effective insomnia remedy, Sleep Minerals II is also beneficial for women with menopause symptoms such as hot flashes or night sweats.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Why flaxseed is good for you?

Research is showing that the benefits of flaxseed include preventing menopause hot flashes, lowering cholesterol, improving heart health and benefiting blood sugar levels. It also improves breast and prostate health.

How flaxseed works?

Flaxseed has a very high amount of omega-3 fatty acids – a high quality type of fat that our body is unable to make on its own. Omega-3 fats can improve the health of the heart, brain, eyes, liver, joints and skin. Flaxseed is also a rich source of fiber, making it an excellent aid to digestion.

Will flaxseed help with constipation?

Flaxseed has been proven to have a dual effectiveness for both constipation and diarrhea. In one study, flaxseed oil and its gel-like fiber was given orally to people and it caused a dose-dependent increase in looser bowel movements – meaning that the higher the dose, the more effective it was.