Good Sleep: The Four Best Vitamins

good sleepGreetings to you,

In our quest for good sleep, there are many natural aids and effective alternatives to sleeping drugs.  The video below focuses on the best vitamins to take.

Other good sleep remedies include taking certain minerals or herbs, taking walks, keeping the bedroom dark and cool, having a good quality mattress and pillow, getting more sunlight during the day, and keeping relationships with others at an upbeat and cheerful tone.

Sleep well!

Video: Sleep Remedies for Insomnia – Best Minerals to Take


Greetings to you,

This brief video is an entertaining overview of the best minerals for creating a deeper, longer, more relaxing sleep.  In this article, we will go into more detail about each one.  There are four minerals that are researched and particularly proven to be good sleep remedies.

Calcium: This mineral is directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase.

Adelle Davis is one of the earliest nutritionists to base her dietary recommendations on scientific research studies. Davis writes about the roles of calcium in her book “Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit.” She suggests natural sleep remedies for insomnia and says: “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the thousands of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Magnesium: In magnesium deficiency, chronic insomnia is one of the main, central symptoms. Sleep is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings. On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was proven in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes that: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.”

Zinc: A study in a scientific journal found evidence indicating that zinc may be involved in the regulation of sleep. Their research concludes that the amount of sleep varies according to the amount of zinc in the blood, while orally administered zinc increases the amount and the quality of sleep in mice and humans.

Another study on zinc points in the direction that people taking extra calcium should also increase their zinc intake in order to prevent calcium from blocking zinc absorption into the body. The richest dietary sources of zinc are oysters, liver and beef, followed by nuts, popcorn, poultry and lamb.

Potassium: One recent study from the Journal “Sleep” researched the effects of potassium supplements on sleep quality.  After one week of taking potassium supplements, there were significant improvements in the quality of sleep and less waking up during the night.

A deficiency of potassium can interfere with restful sleep due to the potential for stiff muscles or muscle spasms in the night. The blood needs to maintain a good balance between potassium and sodium (salt).  Potassium is found abundantly in fresh vegetables and fruits, so these are a good focus as opposed to eating a lot of processed or packaged foods containing high sodium.

One popular supplement containing many of these minerals is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says, “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

Make good use of minerals in foods and supplements to ensure getting a great night’s sleep.  To learn more, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Best Herbs, Vitamins and Minerals for Sleep

minerals for sleepBy Dr. Tariq of the  Nishtar Medical University in Pakistan

Do you struggle to fall asleep or stay asleep during the night? After a hectic day, do you toss around in bed with a preoccupied, heavy head?

Finding the best supplements for better sleep can be frustrating with hundreds of ads and products on the internet.

Does our diet have a role in our sleep? What are the most proven natural sleep aids that have been revealed by scientific research? Read on to learn more about the best minerals, herbs, and vitamins for improving sleep at night.

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), sleep problems are pretty common; in fact, about one-third of Americans do not get a good sleep. Sleep is as essential for a person as food is for a healthy life. A good amount of sleep is required for our brains to function properly.

Every day, good quality sleep enhances learning, memory, problem-solving, and creativity.

What’s more, lack of proper sleep is associated with anxiety, daytime drowsiness, and increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.1

Several supplements on the market contain natural sleep aids with herbs, vitamins, and minerals, but how do these supplements work, and which ones may be the best for an individual?2,3

The best thing to do is to try a small amount of each one of them separately and note the results in a journal. And then compare the results of each one as to which ones were the most beneficial.

HERBS THAT HELP YOU SLEEP

Here are some of the most well-known herbs for relaxation and better sleep.

CHAMOMILE

Chamomile is a herb that has been used for centuries to reduce anxiety, soothe your nerves, and help with sleep. It is normally used as tea or in capsules, as are most of the herbs for sleep.4,5

PASSIONFLOWER

Passionflower contains flavonoids which are a group of natural chemicals found in many herbs and fruits, possessing anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. These act to reduce pain, calm the mind and help with sleep if added with other herbs like lemon balm.6

HOPS FLOWERS

Hops flowers contain a variety of compounds which remedy restlessness, nervousness and sleep difficulties. Pillows filled with these are also used for sleep.7

ASHWAGANDHA

Ashwagandha root extract is a natural compound that induces sleep, improves sleep quality, and soothes the nerves to relieve stress. It can help a person sleep better throughout the night.8

 KAVA

Kava helps some people with sleep disorders. Kava leaves are dried and used in capsules or tablets. It helps to reduce anxiety and provide a calmer, less stressed state of mind.9

MINERALS FOR SLEEP

Many minerals affect the state of health of our bodies and their various systems. A few minerals stand out as bright stars in the sky for their ability to induce good sleep.

MAGNESIUM

Difficulty in sleeping throughout the night is the first symptom of magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium is the essential nutrient for better sleep. It helps the body prepare melatonin, a sleep hormone made in the brain that directly aids good sleep.12

Magnesium also relieves muscle tension and mental stress by helping to produce amino acids, for example, GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid – a signaling molecule in the brain).13

Magnesium is found in green leafy vegetables, avocado, bananas and yogurt.

CALCIUM

Calcium is among the essential nutrients that significantly impact sleep by affecting REM sleep (rapid eye movement sleep – a phase of sleep when your brain is more active and your eyes move faster). Decreased calcium levels affect sleep cycles and lead to difficulty getting deeper and longer sleep.14

Calcium is found in dairy products such as almonds, cheese, yogurt, leafy greens and sardines.  By taking the correct amount of calcium, the sleep cycles of our body can be corrected.

Calcium should be taken in balance with magnesium in a two to one ratio, with twice as much calcium as magnesium.

BEST VITAMINS FOR SLEEP

Sometimes vitamin deficiency can be a cause of sleep deprivation.   If one or more of these are deficient in the diet, a good night’s sleep can become more difficult to obtain.

VITAMIN D

Many experts say that vitamin D deficiency is associated with sleep disorders and if your blood levels of Vitamin D fall to a low level, it can lead to sleep disorders and restless leg syndrome. A person can get vitamin D from sunlight, eggs, salmon, and mushrooms. Supplements can also be used.15

VITAMIN E

Vitamin E is perfect for hair, nails, and skin, but it is also an important nutrient that has a vital role in improving sleep at night. There is a close relationship between memory impairment and sleep deprivation.

Vitamin E has regenerating and oxygenating effects in the brain that can help prevent sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment.16 Vitamin E is found in almonds, leafy greens, sunflower seeds, avocados, and olive oil.

VITAMIN C

People with low levels of vitamin C may have problems with falling asleep and staying asleep at night.17 If vitamin C is used along with Vitamin E, it may help reduce the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. Citrus fruit is a rich source of vitamin C, as well as kale, kiwi, red peppers and stawberries.18

B VITAMINS

Vitamin B-6 plays a vital role in immunity and recalling dreams. It is also essential for the production of melatonin, which is necessary for deep sleep. Hence a vitamin B-6 deficiency may lead to sleep disorders.

Natural sleep-aids with the B vitamins should contain the whole spectrum such as B-1, B-2, B-3, B-5, B-6, and B-12, etc., to avoid any imbalances. They work better together to reduce stress and create melatonin. 19,20

Vitamin B-12 is important for brain and red blood cell functioning. It also helps by regulating sleep-wake cycles and REM sleep.21

THE BOTTOM LINE

Getting a good amount of sleep is vital for good health. Several herbs, minerals, and vitamins can be effective in helping a person fall asleep better and stay asleep longer.  They can be found at health food stores and at nutritionist and chiropractic offices.

Some other good sleep tips would be to go to bed and get up at the same time each day, keep the bedroom cool and dark while sleeping, and use a comfortable mattress, In addition, do some daily exercise that you enjoy such as walking, get outside for some sunlight during the day, and wear earplugs and an eye mask while sleeping.

This natural health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II, and Joints and More, a natural supplement for joint relief, less aches and pains, and more energy.

References:

  1. Saksvik-Lehouillier, I. et al. Mild to moderate partial sleep deprivation is associated with increased impulsivity and decreased positive affect in young adults. Sleep 43, (2020).
  2. Binks, H., Vincent, G. E., Gupta, C., Irwin, C. & Khalesi, S. Effects of Diet on Sleep: A Narrative Review. Nutrients 2020, Vol. 12, Page 936 12, 936 (2020).
  3. Ji, X., Grandner, M. A. & Liu, J. The relationship between micronutrient status and sleep patterns: a systematic review. Public Health Nutrition 20, 687–701 (2017).
  4. Rafii, F., Ameri, F., Haghani, H. & Ghobadi, A. The effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender and chamomile oil on anxiety and sleep quality of patients with burns. Burns 46, 164–171 (2020).
  5. Chang, S. M. & Chen, C. H. Effects of an intervention with drinking chamomile tea on sleep quality and depression in sleep disturbed postnatal women: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Advanced Nursing 72, 306–315 (2016).
  6. Lee, J., Jung, H. Y., Lee, S. I., Choi, J. H. & Kim, S. G. Effects of Passiflora incarnata Linnaeus on polysomnographic sleep parameters in subjects with insomnia disorder: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study. International clinical psychopharmacology 35, 29–35 (2020).
  7. Benkherouf, A. Y., Eerola, K., Soini, S. L. & Uusi-Oukari, M. Humulone Modulation of GABAA Receptors and Its Role in Hops Sleep-Promoting Activity. Frontiers in Neuroscience 14, 1100 (2020).
  8. Cheah, K. L., Norhayati, M. N., Yaacob, L. H. & Rahman, R. A. Effect of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract on sleep: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLOS ONE 16, e0257843 (2021).
  9. Bruni, O., Ferini-Strambi, L., Giacomoni, E. & Pellegrino, P. Herbal Remedies and Their Possible Effect on the GABAergic System and Sleep. Nutrients 2021, Vol. 13, Page 530 13, 530 (2021).
  10. Abbasi, B. et al. The effect of magnesium supplementation on primary insomnia in elderly: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences : The Official Journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences 17, 1161 (2012).
  11. Cao, Y. et al. Magnesium Intake and Sleep Disorder Symptoms: Findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese Adults at Five-Year Follow-Up. Nutrients 2018, Vol. 10, Page 1354 10, 1354 (2018).
  12. Grandner, M. A., Jackson, N., Gerstner, J. R. & Knutson, K. L. Sleep symptoms associated with intake of specific dietary nutrients. Journal of Sleep Research 23, 22–34 (2014).
  13. Romano, F. et al. Vitamin D and Sleep Regulation: Is there a Role for Vitamin D? Current Pharmaceutical Design 26, 2492–2496 (2020).
  14. Alzoubi, K. H., Khabour, O. F., Rashid, B. A., Damaj, I. M. & Salah, H. A. The neuroprotective effect of vitamin E on chronic sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment: The role of oxidative stress. Behavioural Brain Research 226, 205–210 (2012).
  15. Otocka-Kmiecik, A. & Krol, A. The Role of Vitamin C in Two Distinct Physiological States: Physical Activity and Sleep. Nutrients 2020, Vol. 12, Page 3908 12, 3908 (2020).
  16. Grebe, M. et al. Antioxidant Vitamin C Improves Endothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200508-1223OC 173, 897–901 (2012).
  17. Aspy, D. J., Madden, N. A. & Delfabbro, P. Effects of Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) and a B Complex Preparation on Dreaming and Sleep. Perceptual and Motor Skills 125, 451–462 (2018).
  18. Mayer, G., Kröger, M. & Meier-Ewert, K. Effects of vitamin B12 on performance and circadian rhythm in normal subjects. Neuropsychopharmacology 15, 456–464 (1996).

Study Shows “Beauty Sleep” Vital to Attractiveness (Plus Some Good Sleep Aids)

beauty sleepIs “Beauty Sleep” a myth or a reality?  If you want to look attractive and healthy, the best thing you can do is get a good night’s sleep, according to recent research from the British Medical Journal

For the first time, say the authors, there is scientific backing for the concept of beauty sleep.

The study that was led by John Axelsson from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, investigated the relationship between sleep and perceptions of attractiveness and health. The authors believe this research is important in today’s 24 hour society with the number of people increasing who are suffering from sleep disorders and disturbed sleep.

23 participants between the ages of 18 to 31 took part in the study. They were photographed between 2pm and 3pm on two occasions, once after normal sleep and once after being deprived of sleep. Smokers were excluded from the research and no alcohol was allowed for two days prior to the experiment.

The photographs were taken in a well-lit room and the distance to the camera was fixed. During both photography sessions participants wore no make-up, had their hair loose (combed back if they had long hair) and underwent similar cleaning or shaving procedures. They were asked to have a relaxed, neutral facial expression for both photos.

Sixty-five observers, who were blinded to the sleep status of the subjects, rated the photographs for attractiveness and whether the individuals looked healthy or unhealthy and tired or not tired.

The results?  The observers judged that the faces of the sleep-deprived participants looked less healthy, less attractive and more tired.  The study authors then concluded that the facial signals of sleep deprived people can be very telling – affecting their appearance, their attractiveness and how healthy they look.

A comment from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs: To preserve your “Beauty Sleep” and attractiveness at those times when you’re experiencing insomnia or sleeplessness, try taking some natural minerals to soothe you to sleep.

A popular example of this is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, which are the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.  It comes in a softgel form for rapid and complete absorption.

Wendy R. of Honolulu, Hawaii says: “My friends know that I’ve had chronic insomnia for a long time. Surprisingly, I received the Sleep Minerals II and began taking it and found this thing really works. In the past if I ever got a good nights sleep I’d say ‘I slept like a baby’, but that’s the wrong comparison. Those little guys get up every two hours. I am actually beginning to sleep like an adult — a much-rested adult.”

To learn more, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.
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Source: The British Medical Journal: http://www.bmj.com/content/341/bmj.c6614

How Can Holiday Stress Be Reduced? 5 Great Tips That Work

holiday stress

How Can Holiday Stress Be Reduced?
5 Great Tips That Work

Greetings to you,

It’s Jobee from Nutrition Breakthroughs. If you or someone you care about experiences holiday stress or insomnia during the holiday times, then these healthy tips will come in handy.

1. If you drink coffee, try to replace some of it with herbal teas such as chamomile, lemon balm or passionflower.  These are all proven to calm and relax and help with better sleep.

2. Do some regular, gentle exercise that you enjoy.  Some ideas would be walking, dancing, stretching or cycling. 

3. Spend some time outdoors and if it’s very cold, bundle up!  Especially if you spend a lot of time indoors in front of a computer screen, go outside and look at the trees, houses, clouds, buildings and other large objects. This helps the body and mind unwind and get some rest.

4. Turn off the TV, computer or cell phone at least an hour before bedtime.  The lighted screens of these electronics have been found to reduce melatonin levels in the body, which is a natural hormone that regulates the sleep and wake cycles.

5. Enjoy the celebration of thanks and goodwill and if any difference of opinion starts to develop with a friend or family member, just move on to the next topic and direct their attention to something you know they like or admire.

Here’s to your good  health, good sleep, and the very best of the season!

Jobee Knight
Nutrition Breakthroughs
Maker of the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II, and Joints and More, a natural supplement for joint relief, less aches and pains, and more energy.

Chamomile Tea Benefits: Proven for Better Sleep, Good Health

chamomile tea benefitsChamomile flowers are a member of the daisy family, with their bright gold cones that shine in the center of white petals. There are many proven chamomile tea benefits for health.

With more than one million cups of chamomile tea consumed every day and supplements of chamomile capsules, liquid extracts, ointments, and essential oils in wide use, chamomile is one of the most highly used and research-proven medicinal plants.  It has been studied for use with insomnia, heart conditions, colds, inflammation, skin eczema, upset stomach, osteoporosis, anxiety, sore throat, wound healing and more.

Chamomile for Sleep and Insomnia

Chamomile has long been used as a natural sleep aid and insomnia remedy.  The powerful oils contained in its flowers provide a calming effect for sleeplessness, nervousness and anxiety.  In one study, heart patients were given chamomile tea and fell into a deep sleep.  From another study with animals that was done in Japan, calmness and relaxation were increased and the time needed to fall asleep was significantly reduced.  Another study showed that chamomile greatly reduces anxiety and increases well-being.

Stomach Conditions Helped by Chamomile

Chamomile is one of the main “go to” herbs for digestive disorders like upset stomach, ulcers, diarrhea and gas.  It helps to relax muscle contractions, particularly in the smooth muscles that make up the intestines.  In one journal study from Switzerland, the herbal combination of iberis (an herb in the cabbage family), peppermint and chamomile were shown to be effective in the treatment of stomach indigestion, irritation and inflammation.

Eczema and Skin Conditions

Inflammation of the skin is widely treated and remedied by topical chamomile preparations.  It has the ability to penetrate into the deeper layers of the skin and help with eczema and other skin inflammations.  In a European medical journal, a cream with chamomile extract was tested against a hydrocortisone cream.  After a 2-week treatment, the chamomile cream showed a mild superiority in effectiveness over hydrocortisone.

Osteoporosis, Bone Health and Chamomile

In the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, chamomile extract was studied for its ability to prevent the bone loss that can occur as people age.  Chamomile demonstrated the ability to help mineralize bone cells and showed an anti-estrogenic quality.  The researchers noted that this may be due to chamomile having a quality as a possible regulator of excess estrogen in the body.

Calcium and Chamomile – A Winning Duo

Calcium is also directly related to our good sleep. In one study, called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, the author notes that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency causes difficulty with falling asleep.  This same study says that “Muscle cramps associated with a calcium deficiency often occur at night and without exertion.”

In another study published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase when most dreaming occurs.  This study discovered that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency.

Best Minerals for Sleep: Calcium and Magnesium

One natural insomnia remedy showing good results is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This sleep aid contains powerful forms of calcium and magnesium, the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep, as well as for restless leg syndrome, stomach health, teenage insomnia and menopause insomnia.  The ingredients include vitamin D and zinc and are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot.  I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

Summary for Chamomile and Calcium

Anyone who has a strong allergy to plants like daisies or ragweed (with its tiny green flowers) should start with a very small amount of chamomile, whether using it as a tea, supplement or skin ointment.  Most people can gain benefits from chamomile without any reactions.  It is one of nature’s most potent herbs and can help with calming insomnia, anxiety, muscle spasms, PMS, skin inflammations, stomach disorders, hemorrhoids, diarrhea, arthritis and more.

As a first line of defense against sleeplessness and insomnia, chamomile and calcium are good bets.  Coming from the worlds of herbal and mineral sleep aids, they are normally taken safely without addictive qualities or side effects.

This natural health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

Why does chamomile make you sleepy?

Chamomile has long been used as a natural sleep aid and insomnia remedy. The powerful oils contained in its flowers provide a calming effect for sleeplessness, nervousness and anxiety.  In one study, heart patients were given chamomile tea and fell into a deep sleep.

What are the health benefits of chamomile?

Chamomile is one of the most highly used and research-proven medicinal plants.  It has been studied for use with insomnia, heart conditions, colds, inflammation, skin eczema, upset stomach, osteoporosis, anxiety, sore throat, wound healing and more.

Why is chamomile tea good for you?

Chamomile is one of the main “go to” herbs for digestive disorders like upset stomach, ulcers, diarrhea and gas. It helps to relax muscle contractions, particularly in the smooth muscles that make up the intestines. Chamomile also has the ability to help mineralize bone cells and strengthen bones.

Top 20 Benefits of Magnesium: Good Sleep, Nerves, Heart, Bones

magnesium pumpkin seedsGreetings to you,

Included below is a wonderful chart that contains the top 20 health benefits of magnesium.  Some of these health benefits include remedying sleeplessness and insomnia, calming the nerves, strengthening the heart, lowering blood pressure, supporting the bones, relaxing muscles and relieving headaches.

Magnesium for Sleep

Chronic insomnia is one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Sleep
in magnesium deficiency is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings.
On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was shown in a study done by the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.  Other studies have found magnesium to enhance sleep and relaxation as well.

Calcium and Sleep

Calcium is also directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep, is related to a calcium deficiency. Restoration to the normal course of sleep was achieved following the normalization of the blood calcium level.

Sleep Minerals II

This health news and the magnesium chart is shared with you by Nutrition Breakthroughs and its natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II is the original magnesium and calcium based sleep remedy and is known for soothing even the worst insomnia.  It helps everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to older seniors, to everyone in between, to get a good night’s sleep. 

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals — I’m so sold on them I could go door to door promoting them. I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Check out the top magnesium health benefits in the chart below!

benefits of magnesium To your good health,

Jobee Knight
Nutrition Breakthroughs
Maker of Sleep Minerals II

Proven Benefits of Flaxseed: Heart, Stomach, Hot Flashes, More

benefits of flaxseedFlaxseed, also known as linseed, is a high fiber food that has been cultivated for thousands of years around the world. One of the main benefits of flaxseed is that its a rich source of the healthiest type of fat, known as omega 3 fatty acid.

This group of healthy fats also includes salmon, walnuts, chia seeds and sardines. Flax is a also complete protein source, containing all nine of the essential amino acids.

Research is showing that the benefits of flaxseed include preventing menopause hot flashes, lowering cholesterol, improving heart health and benefiting blood sugar levels. It also improves breast and prostate health and is known to be an effective laxative which helps with constipation by adding fiber and bulk to the intestines.

Flaxseed has been proven to have a dual effectiveness for both constipation and diarrhea.  This study on flaxseed comes from the Natural Products Research Division of a Medical College in Pakistan.  Flaxseed oil and its gel-like fiber was given orally to people and it caused a dose-dependent increase in looser bowel movements – meaning that the higher the dose, the more effective it was. The study also showed flaxseed helpful for people with diarrhea.

Mayo Clinic breast health specialist Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., recently conducted a study on crushed flaxseed for hot flashes and menopause symptoms. The women were given six weeks of flaxseed therapy, consisting of 40 grams (one and a half ounces) of crushed flaxseed eaten daily. Study participants were asked questions that were translated into their individual hot flash scores.

The result was that their frequency of hot flashes decreased by fifty percent. Participants also reported good improvements in mood, joint and muscle pain, chills, and sweating. This was a significant benefit to their health and quality of life. Dr. Pruthi said: “We are quite pleased with the improvements noted by these women in their quality of life. Not only does flaxseed seem to alleviate hot flashes, but it appears to have overall health benefits as well.”

Flaxseed may provide a way for men with high cholesterol to lower it without using drugs. The Iowa State University Nutrition and Wellness Research Center recently studied ground flaxseed for this purpose and found that it decreased cholesterol in men by around ten percent over the three month study. The men ate three tablespoons of flaxseed daily.

Flaxseed was recently studied for the improvement of blood sugar levels in a study from the “Nutrition Research” journal. In this study, overweight men and postmenopausal women who had pre-diabetes consumed ground flaxseed daily for 12 weeks. This resulted in decreased glucose and insulin levels and also an improved insulin sensitivity in the participants. Having a better insulin sensitivity is healthier as this allows the body to utilize sugar in the blood more effectively.

Flaxseeds are available as whole seeds, ground seeds and flax seed oil. The ground seeds may be the healthiest option as they contain the most protein and fiber. Flaxseeds blend well into many foods, such as smoothies, hot and cold cereals, can be sprinkled on salads or hot vegetables, and even used in home-baked goods like muffins. The seeds are best stored in the refrigerator to preserve their benefits. Most of the studies on flaxseed used one tablespoon per day. 

This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a provider of nutrition articles and effective natural remedies since 2001. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Besides being an effective insomnia remedy, Sleep Minerals II is also beneficial for women with menopause symptoms such as hot flashes or night sweats.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Why flaxseed is good for you?

Research is showing that the benefits of flaxseed include preventing menopause hot flashes, lowering cholesterol, improving heart health and benefiting blood sugar levels. It also improves breast and prostate health.

How flaxseed works?

Flaxseed has a very high amount of omega-3 fatty acids – a high quality type of fat that our body is unable to make on its own. Omega-3 fats can improve the health of the heart, brain, eyes, liver, joints and skin. Flaxseed is also a rich source of fiber, making it an excellent aid to digestion.

Will flaxseed help with constipation?

Flaxseed has been proven to have a dual effectiveness for both constipation and diarrhea. In one study, flaxseed oil and its gel-like fiber was given orally to people and it caused a dose-dependent increase in looser bowel movements – meaning that the higher the dose, the more effective it was.

Sleep Foods That Help You: Best Sleep Inducing Foods

Sleep better with Sleep Minerals II
Which foods help you sleep better? The Nutrition Breakthroughs Blog has provided several articles on the best sleep inducing foods, and those that follow below are the top five most popular articles of all time.

1. Sleep Foods Chart: The Top Proven Foods for Insomnia

This article features a chart that summarizes research studies on foods that are high in the natural sleep hormone known as melatonin. What foods are high in melatonin?  Find out more about walnuts, cherries, almonds and more.  Also included in this article are good sources of potassium, calcium and magnesium – all proven to help remedy insomnia.

2. Melatonin Rich Fruits for Sleep: Studies from Nutrition Breakthroughs    fruit melatonin

Melatonin levels start rising in the evening and go up to a peak level in the early hours of the morning, perhaps around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m, and then they reduce.

This may partially explain why some people can sleep fine for a few hours and then suddenly find themselves wide awake and unable to go back to sleep.

Do bananas help you sleep?  Learn more about the research study that shows how tropical fruits such as bananas and pineapples increase melatonin in the body. It was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

3. Insomnia Remedies: The Best and Worst Foods for Promoting Sleep

What foods are sleep inducing? This article includes an informative, short chart that contains the five best foods and five worst foods for promoting sleep.

Some foods can act as natural sleep aids, while others can make your time in bed a struggle with tossing and turning all night.

heathiest foods4. Food for Sleep: Study Says Salmon Remedies Insomnia

Researchers in Norway have proven that eating fish has a positive impact on good sleep and overall daily functioning.

5. Insomnia Remedies: The Science Behind Sleep Inducing Foods

This article focuses on articles from research journals that have studied which foods are best for inducing sleep, and it also has some doctor recommendations on good bedtime snacks.

This collection of natural health articles on sleep helping foods is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2001.

Nutrition breakthroughs makes Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin D, and also Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, aches and pains, stronger hair and nails and more energy.

Which foods help you sleep better?

Studies have shown that certain foods are high in melatonin and magnesium and can help with a better night’s sleep. These include bananas, almonds, walnuts and tart cherries or their juice. Magnesium rich foods include yogurt, avocado, figs, nut butter, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds.

What foods are high in melatonin?

Learn more about walnuts, tart cherries, almonds, bananas and more.  Also included in this article are good food sources of potassium, calcium and magnesium – all proven to help remedy insomnia.

Do bananas help you sleep?

Bananas are very high in potassium and a deficiency of potassium can interfere with restful sleep. Eating a banana before bedtime may help reduce nighttime awakenings and provide a better, deeper night’s sleep. Potassium is found abundantly in fresh vegetables and fruits, so these are a good focus as opposed to eating a lot of processed or packaged foods containing high salt.

What foods are sleep inducing?

Studies have shown that the following foods and beverages are sleep inducing: Bananas, tart cherries, tart cherry juice, almonds, walnuts, yogurt, salmon, pumpkin seeds, pineapple, nut butter, turkey, kiwi fruit and warm milk. Soothing teas shown to help sleep include chamomile, lavender, lemon balm and passionflower.

Hot Flashes in Menopause: Studies Show Magnesium and Primrose Oil Effective

menopause hot flashesMenopause is a natural process when the production of female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) declines and a woman stops having her monthly periods.  It usually happens gradually between the ages of 45 and 55.  

During this time, a woman can experience uncomfortable menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety, fatigue and insomnia.

Hormone replacement therapy drugs can help hot flashes, but according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, the long-term use of hormone replacement drugs can increase the risks of heart disease, stroke, blood clots in the lungs and breast disease  As a result, more and more women today are seeking to use natural remedies.

One such remedy is evening primrose oil.  This oil comes from the seeds of a wildflower that grows throughout the United States. In a study from the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, researchers tested the effect of evening primrose oil on 56 menopausal women aged 45 to 59 with hot flashes.  The women were given two capsules per day of evening primrose (500 mg per capsule) for a continuous 6 weeks.  This resulted in a 42% improvement in the severity of hot flashes, as well as beneficial improvements in their life activities.

Can magnesium help menopause symptoms? Mineral supplements such as magnesium and calcium are of good benefit to menopausal women with hot flashes and night sweats.  One example is a study from the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System. Women with at least 14 hot flashes a week received 400 milligrams of magnesium oxide for 4 weeks, increasing to 800 mg. per day if needed.  At the end of the study, the magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes from 52 to 28 per week, which is a 41.4% reduction. Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

The 29 participants in the study were breast cancer survivors, thus they were unable to take the usual hot flash medications that have estrogenic activity such as hormone replacement or soy supplements.  Many women, breast cancer survivors or not, prefer to take a non estrogen-active natural remedy for hot flashes and night sweats, and the researchers concluded that magnesium appears to safely reduce hot flashes with few side effects and at minimal cost.

Can magnesium help balance hormones? Yes, in fact as menopause approaches, there is an emerging link between estrogen decline, menopause symptoms, and the aspect of mineral deficiency. Mildred Seeling, M.D. describes this in her report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. She says “Estrogen enhances magnesium utilization and uptake by soft tissues and bone, and may explain the resistance of young women to heart disease and osteoporosis — as well as the increased prevalence of these diseases when estrogen production ceases.”

Magnesium works best when it’s balanced with calcium. The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis writes of mineral deficiency during menopause in her book Let’s Get Well. Davis says: “Calcium is less well absorbed and the urinary losses are greater when the output of estrogen decreases. Such calcium-deficiency symptoms as nervousness, irritability, insomnia and headaches are common.”

Magnesium has also been found to help other health conditions.  According to Dr. Michael T. Murray, Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine, “In addition to helping with hot flashes, correction of low magnesium status may have additional health benefits. Magnesium deficiency is extremely common in Americans, and in addition to the well-known association between low magnesium and increased risk for cardiovascular disease, low magnesium levels have also been linked to an increase in Alzheimer’s disease, decreased muscle performance, insulin-resistance, and osteoporosis.”

Are there forms of magnesium that are more absorbable than others? Which magnesium for menopause?  Some of the most highly absorbed forms of minerals are those that are mixed into a healthy base of natural oils. When carrier oils are used along with minerals in a softgel supplement, a creamy paste is formed inside that encourages increased mineral absorption. This results in a supplement that is absorbed more rapidly and fully than hard tablets or even powdered capsules.

One natural sleep aid that helps with hot flashes and night sweats and has increased in popularity among menopausal women is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This insomnia remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia. The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more fully assimilated and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better, and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals II and after several days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

Natural menopause remedies are a healthier option for women with hot flashes, night sweats and insomnia.  For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit this page.

Can magnesium help menopause symptoms?

Mineral supplements such as magnesium and calcium are of good benefit to menopausal women with hot flashes and night sweats.  One example is a study from the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System.  Women with at least 14 hot flashes a week received 400 milligrams of magnesium oxide for 4 weeks, increasing to 800 mg. per day if needed.  At the end of the study, the magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes from 52 to 28 per week, which is a 41.4% reduction. Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

Can magnesium help balance hormones?

Yes, as menopause approaches, there is an emerging link between estrogen decline, menopause symptoms and the aspect of mineral deficiency. Mildred Seeling, M.D. describes this in her report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. She says “Estrogen enhances magnesium utilization and uptake by soft tissues and bone, and may explain the resistance of young women to heart disease and osteoporosis — as well as the increased prevalence of these diseases when estrogen production ceases.”

Which magnesium for menopause?

Some of the most highly absorbed forms of minerals are those that are mixed into a healthy base of natural oils. When carrier oils are used along with minerals in a softgel supplement, a creamy paste is formed inside that encourages increased mineral absorption. This results in a supplement that is absorbed more rapidly and fully than hard tablets or even powdered capsules.