Can’t Stay Asleep? 26 Sleep Tips and Aids from NaturalNews

sleep aidBy Joli Tripp from Natural News

Chronic insomnia can wreck your life. These 26 simple tips can help you stay asleep through the night. Written by a reformed insomniac.

Staying asleep through the night can be torture for the weary.  Sleep is a natural body process making it seem rather simple.  It’s not simple, if you are an insomniac.

If resorting to pharmaceutical sleep aids is not your cup of chamomile tea, then check your daily routine with these tips for a great night of zzzz’s.

During the Day:

  1. Invest in a new mattress or pillow if you wake up with a sore neck or back. Determine if you are a side, back or stomach sleeper. Buy your pillow based on keeping your neck in line with your spine.
  2. Buy some killer threadcount sheets. Whether you prefer soft and luxurious or crisp and clean, go for the highest threadcount your budget can handle.
  3. Regular exercise is probably the best way to improve your sleep. Be sure to exercise at least 2-3 hours before bedtime. Exercise tires your body so that your body and mind can rest. Even a brisk walk can help. Your body will heat up during exercise and your heart rate will increase. As you cool down, you will be more relaxed.
  4. Increase your light exposure during the day by opening blinds, going outside or buy a light therapy box. A light therapy box can simulate sunshine and help to reset your circadian rhythms.
  5. No napping during the day as it can make insomnia even worse. If you find yourself falling asleep on the couch long before bedtime, get up and do something mildly stimulating until it is time for bed.
  6. Ditch caffeine at least 6 hours before bedtime. Make sure caffeine is out of your system by bedtime.
  7. Stop eating and drinking alcohol 2 hours before bed. Give your food a chance to digest before going to sleep. Alcohol, while it can help lull you to sleep, is only disruptive later on in the night.
  8. Take a magnesium supplement with dinner. Magnesium deficiency is rampant in our society with some estimates of up to 80% of us are magnesium deficient. Bonus—magnesium helps with constipation too.

Preparing for Bed:

  1. Establish a regular bedtime schedule. Your circadian rhythms cannot handle trying to figure out when it’s time to shut down and start critical background processes that occur when you sleep if your bedtimes vary. Staying up past your bedtime for a Saturday night out and staying in bed late on a Sunday morning can wreak havoc on your sleep.
  2. Take a hot shower/warm bath an hour or so before bed (add epsom salts to your bath and a few drops of soothing essential oils like Lavender, Chamomile or Sandalwood). There is nothing like being clean before bed, especially on clean sheet night!
  3. Make preparations for the next day. Pick out tomorrow’s clothes, plan the next day’s meals, place things you will need to remember to take by the backdoor– whatever tasks may worry you during the night.
  4. Do it or make a list. If undone household chores are stressing you out, do them now and the exertion may help you stay asleep longer. If not, make a list of what needs to be done to clear your mind.
  5. Start turning down the lights an hour or so before bed. Your body is signaled that sleep time is approaching.
  6. Avoid drinking a lot of liquids right before bed so you won’t have to get up in the night to go to the bathroom. On the flipside, be sure that dehydration is not one of your reasons for lack of sleep. Drink plenty of water during the day.
  7. Put a notepad, flashlight and pen by your bedside to record those epic ideas you come up with in the middle of the night (or things you forgot to do) rather than ruminate about them all night.

At Bedtime:

  1. Turn down the A/C to about 65 degrees. A too hot or too cold bedroom can disturb your sleep.
  2. Put the iPad/iPhone/iWatch/iPod in another room. Not only are electronic devices a distraction but the blue light emitted from TV, laptop, tablet and smartphone screens disrupts the brain’s natural melatonin production and can trigger alertness, keeping you awake later. And middle-of-the-night texts and emails can disrupt your sleep as well.
  3. Turn off the TV. In fact, just remove it from the bedroom entirely. No noise, no light, no insomnia.
  4. Darken the room completely. Close blinds and curtains. Hang room darkening curtains. Wear a sleep mask if necessary.
  5. Wear earplugs or use a white noise generator. A noise may wake you up and you won’t even realize what woke you. Mask outside noises like barking dogs, noisy neighbors or traffic with a white noise machine.
  6. Turn on your aromatherapy diffuser and add essential oils scents such as Ylang Ylang, Orange, Clary Sage or Geranium. Be sure your diffuser doesn’t have a light on it or is too noisy.
  7. Turn the alarm clock away so you cannot see it. Staring at it won’t help.

In the Middle of the Night:

  1. If your stomach wakes you up with indigestion, try some therapeutic-grade ginger and/or peppermint essential oil or eat some ginger or caraway seeds.
  2. Go to another room if you lie awake for more than 15 minutes. Sit in another part of the house until you feel a little groggy. Read a book until you get sleepy and then go back to bed.
  3. If you have to get up at night to go to the bathroom, try not to turn on the light. Use a flashlight instead. The light will signal your brain (and your pets) that it is time to wake up.

Most Important Way to Beat Insomnia:

  1. Clean up your nutrition. If you make no other changes to your routine, dietary changes will have the most effect on your sleep. Add more veggies and fruit, ditch the refined and processed foods, and skip the sugar.

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This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of Sleep Minerals II, the effective natural sleep aid with calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and zinc.

Tammy M. of Meridian, Idaho says: “I was plagued with insomnia for five years and desperate for a breakthrough. Nothing has helped me more than Sleep Minerals — I’m so sold on this sleep aid that I could go door to door promoting them. I’m 60 years old and have never slept so soundly.”

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Joli Tripp is a wellness advocate, blogger, realtor, wife, and self-proclaimed foodie. Joli is passionate about making simple changes at the grocery store, at home and in life to attain abundant health. Her journey back to health is held out for others to examine and gather their courage to do the same. She provides practical advice about food, wellness, home and garden using natural solutions such as essential oils.

via Natural News: Can’t Stay Asleep? 26 Tips to help you Sleep Tight.

Magnesium Foods Chart: Remedy Insomnia and Pain

Magnesium foods Magnesium deficiency is very common these days.  A recent government study shows that 68% of Americans do not consume the recommended daily intake of magnesium, which is 400 milligrams per day.

Magnesium can be found in foods such as green leafy vegetables, black beans, pumpkin seeds, almonds, avocados, figs, bananas, brown rice, and other beans, nuts and seeds. Magnesium supplements are a good option as well, particularly those containing magnesium citrate which is very absorbable.

Sidney Baker, M.D., a practicing doctor with a special interest in the nutritional aspects of chronic health problems says: “Magnesium deficiency can affect virtually every organ and system of the body. One may experience muscle twitches, cramps, soreness, back aches, neck pain, tension headaches, and fatigue or weakness.”

Studies show that magnesium can soothe insomnia, support heart health, normalize blood sugar, relieve headaches and ease menopause symptoms.  In one study from the University of Iran, people with insomnia were given magnesium tablets twice a day for eight weeks.  They experienced significant increases in quality sleep time, with less night time interruptions and fewer early morning awakenings.

Magnesium can help prevent diabetes.  Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health evaluated the dietary intake of specific nutrients for more than 85,000 women and 42,000 men.  They found that the men and women whose diets included the largest amounts of magnesium were the least likely to develop type 2 diabetes.  Most of the participants consumed magnesium through foods, such as whole grains, nuts and green leafy vegetables.

Studies have found that people with migraine headaches have low concentrations of magnesium in their body. The word “cephalalgia” literally means head pain or headache. In a German study of 81 migraine patients published in the journal “Cephalalgia”, 42 percent of the people taking oral magnesium reduced both the duration and intensity of their migraine attacks. They also reduced their reliance on medications to control migraines.

One supplement shown to be helpful for insomnia and pain is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This formula contains highly absorbable forms of calcium citrate and magnesium citrate, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, aches and pains, bone strength and menopause insomnia.

Sleep Minerals II also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says: “I had become dependent on sleeping drugs and couldn’t sleep without them. Now I take the Sleep Minerals before bed and I can sleep through the night without drugs. I’m also able to easily fall back to sleep if I do have to get up. Another benefit is it helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Studies: Magnesium Benefits Insomnia, Hot Flashes, Heart and Bones

magnesium benefitsWhat qualities make magnesium such an essential mineral, required by the body for literally hundreds of its functions? One key feature of magnesium is that it’s a partner or “co-factor” with enzymes that allows them to do their work.

Enzymes are energized protein molecules that initiate chemical reactions inside the cells – orchestrating life’s processes in every organ, gland, tissue and cell.

Research studies are finding that magnesium affects over 300 processes in the body, relaxes muscles and nerves, and helps insomnia, hot flashes, heart health, bone strength, diabetes, migraine headaches and more.

According to the Human Nutrition Research Center of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency is chronic insomnia, restless sleep and frequent awakenings during the night. In one of their studies, a diet high in magnesium contributed to deeper sleep with fewer interruptions.

Another study from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia. Two magnesium tablets twice a day (250 mg. each) resulted in significant increases in sleep time and reduced cortisol levels in the body, which is a stress hormone that can keep people awake.

Hot flashes and night sweats are common symptoms of premenopause and menopause. Regarding magnesium for menopause, a study was done at the Virginia University Health System. Women who experienced hot flashes many times per week received 400 milligrams of magnesium for 4 weeks — increasing to 800 milligrams per day if needed. At the end of the study, the magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes by half. Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

Magnesium is also magnificent for the heart. In a study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, research scientists examined data from thousands of women over the course of a 26-year follow up period. The women who consumed the highest amounts of magnesium had a 34% reduced risk of sudden cardiac death. Another study from the journal “Circulation” found that magnesium supplements allow people with heart disease to exercise for longer times and it actually helps repair the ability of blood vessels to open up.

Supplements with well-absorbed forms of magnesium are becoming increasingly popular for those with insomnia. One of the more effective sleep aids is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. It contains calcium and magnesium in combination with vitamin D and zinc. The minerals and vitamins are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils; creating a creamy paste inside that results in quick absorption and a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

Magnesium is one of the super-heroes of natural remedies. This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II. For more information on the many benefits of magnesium and calcium, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Magnesium Deficiency Symptoms: Insomnia, Ringing Ears, Muscle Cramps

Greetings,

Below is an informative chart containing five signs of magnesium deficiency.  These include poor sleep and insomnia, ringing ears, muscle cramps, abnormal heart function and kidney stones.

Chronic insomnia is one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency.  Sleep in magnesium deficiency is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep.  This was proven in a study done at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

When taking magnesium supplements it is important to balance it with calcium.  The recommended ratio is twice as much calcium as magnesium.

This health news is provided by http://NutritionBreakthroughs.com. Since 2001 Nutrition Breakthroughs has provided natural health articles and effective natural remedies.  Their mission is to provide nutritional supplements that get results and therefore help people to avoid drugs and their side effects.

Since 2009, their natural sleep remedy Sleep Minerals II has been keeping that promise — by soothing even the worst insomnia and helping everyone from teenagers, to women with menopause symptoms, to seniors to get a good night’s sleep.

Top 5 Health Benefits of Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral for staying healthy and is required for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. Multiple health benefits of magnesium include transmission of nerve impulses, body temperature regulation, detoxification, energy production, and the formation of healthy bones and teeth.

Health specialists have always emphasized the importance of including adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals in our daily diet. Zinc, calcium, and magnesium are three of the most important minerals essential for good health. Magnesium aids in the absorption of calcium by the body, while zinc actively supports the body’s immune system.

Women of all ages benefit immensely from the intake of magnesium. Besides keeping osteoporosis at bay, magnesium health benefits in women include relief from symptoms of menopause and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It also minimizes the risk of premature labor.

The other crucial health benefits of magnesium include protein synthesis, relief from bronchospasm (constricted airways) in the lungs, and improvement of parathyroid function. It boosts the bio-availability of vitamin B6 and cholesterol, improves muscle functioning, and prevents osteoporosis, insomnia, constipation, heart attacks, hypertension, constipation, migraines, kidney stones, and gallstones.

Good dietary sources of magnesium include nuts (especially almonds), whole grains, wheat germ, fish, and green leafy vegetables. As with most nutrients, daily needs for magnesium cannot be met from food alone which is why magnesium dietary supplements are recommended as well.

The top five health benefits of magnesium are:

Magnesium may reverse osteoporosis

      Multiple research studies conducted have suggested that calcium supplemented with magnesium improves bone mineral density. Magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulate calcium, resulting in osteoporosis. Intake of recommended levels of magnesium is important because it averts osteoporosis.

Magnesium prevents cardiovascular diseases

        One of the most important benefits of magnesium is that it is associated with lowering the risk of coronary heart diseases. Dietary surveys have suggested that sufficient magnesium intake may reduce the chance of having a stroke. Magnesium deficiency increases the risk of abnormal heart rhythms, which increases the risk of complications after a heart attack. Therefore, consuming recommended amounts of magnesium dietary supplements may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system.

Magnesium regulates high blood pressure

      Magnesium plays a key role in regulating blood pressure naturally. Magnesium supplements and a diet including plenty of fruits and vegetables, which are good sources of potassium and magnesium, are consistently associated with lowering blood pressure.

Magnesium treats diabetes

      Studies show that individuals with a magnesium deficiency have a risk of developing type-2 diabetes and severe diabetic retinopathy. Magnesium aids in carbohydrate metabolism and influences the release and activity of insulin, thereby controlling blood glucose levels. It has been proven that for every 100 milligrams of increase in magnesium daily intake, there was a 15 percent decrease in the risk of developing type-2 diabetes.

Magnesium treats migraines, insomnia and depression

    The numerous magnesium health benefits also include the treatment of migraines, insomnia, and symptoms of depression. Magnesium is also known to cure panic attacks, stress, anxiety, and undue agitations. Magnesium supplements considerably reduce the severity of such attacks and may also help in reducing the rate of recurrence.

Because magnesium is so essential to energy production, common symptoms of magnesium depletion include fatigue, along with headaches, insomnia, and muscle pain, cramps, and spasms.

A note from the blog author: Taking a daily magnesium supplement is a great help that supports many areas of our health.

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This news is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of magnesium and calcium, along with vitamin D and zinc.

Article by Dr. Carolyn Dean, courtesy of NewsMaxHealth – http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/mktnews/magnesium-health-benefits-of-magnesium-supplements/2014/08/27/id/591254/

Top 10 Magnesium Rich Foods for Better Sleep and Greater Health

Greetings to you,

Magnesium deficiency is very common these days.  A recent government study shows that 68% of Americans do not consume the recommended daily intake of magnesium.  I’ve included a helpful chart below that contains some of the top magnesium rich foods.  Magnesium supplements are a good option as well, particularly those containing magnesium citrate which is very absorbable.

Sidney Baker, M.D., a practicing doctor with a special interest in the nutritional aspects of chronic health problems says: “Magnesium deficiency can affect virtually every organ and system of the body. One may experience muscle twitches, cramps, soreness, back aches, neck pain, tension headaches, and fatigue or weakness.”

Studies show that magnesium can soothe insomnia, support heart health, normalize blood sugar, and relieve headaches.  In one study from the University of Iran, people with insomnia were given magnesium tablets twice a day for eight weeks.  They experienced significant increases in quality sleep time, with less night time interruptions and fewer early morning awakenings.

This news is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs. For more information on the original magnesium and calcium based natural sleep aid, visit the Sleep Minerals II web page.

To your good health,

Jobee Knight
Nutrition Breakthroughs.com

Nutritionist Adelle Davis Recommends Calcium for Insomnia, Menopause and PMS

The use of prescription sleeping drugs, such as Ambien, Lunesta and Sonata, has been steadily increasing.  Global sales for all sleeping pills, called hypnotics, will top $5 billion in the next several years.  Most sleeping pills, especially when taken over long periods of time, have considerable side effects, stay in the bloodstream, and give a hangover effect the next day and beyond.  They can become addictive, impair memory, reduce performance on the job and at home, and contribute to machine and car accidents.

Adelle Davis is one of the earliest nutritionists to base her dietary recommendations on scientific research studies.  Davis writes about the roles of calcium in her book “Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit”.  She suggests a natural sleep aid for insomnia and says: “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the thousands of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Regarding the many roles of calcium in women’s health, Davis says: “The amount of calcium in a woman’s blood parallels the activity of the ovaries. The blood calcium falls to such an extent during the week prior to menstruation that PMS with nervous tension, irritability, and perhaps mental depression results. At the onset of menstruation, the blood calcium takes a further drop, often causing cramps of the muscular walls of the uterus.”

Davis continues: “During the menopause, the lack of the ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone) causes severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur.  At these times, high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

One natural insomnia remedy gaining popularity with women and men of all ages is Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com.  Sleep Minerals II contains powerful forms of the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D and zinc.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules  and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better, and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. in Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia, it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired. I also had crawling and tingling feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and after a few days of taking it, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/sleep-minerals-ii-effective-natural-sleep-aid-for-insomnia-nutrition-breakthroughs/

Causes and Remedies for Hot Flashes and Night Sweats

A night sweat is a “hot flash” that occurs in the night, often while one is sleeping.  A hot flash, also called a hot flush, is a sudden unexpected feeling of warmth and often a breakout of sweating in the upper half of the body. These flashes are experienced by 80% of women around the time of menopause, and men can also have them due to a lessening of testosterone.

At night time while a woman sleeps, her body temperature rises steeply just prior to a hot flash, causing her to wake up.  The National Sleep Foundation writes that as many as 61% of post-menopausal women report having symptoms of insomnia and less satisfying sleep, due in part due to hot flashes interrupting their sleep with frequent awakenings.

Dr. John R. Lee, M.D. explains the source of hot flashes in his book: “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Menopause”.  There is an area of the brain that controls the amounts of estrogen and progesterone made by the ovaries.  When these two hormones become depleted as in menopause, the brain sends out signals for the ovaries to make more hormones, but they no longer respond to these prompts.

The signaling system can go awry as the brain sends out more and more signals and actually begins to “shout”.  This over-activity begins to affect adjacent areas of the brain; particularly the area that controls body temperature and sweating mechanisms — thus the occurrence of hot flashes.

Sometimes spicy food, hot beverages, caffeine, alcohol or cigarettes can bring on a hot flash. For help with night sweats in bed, keep the bedroom cool and keep a washcloth in a bowl of ice near the bed to use on the forehead or chest as needed. To minimize hot flashes during the summer weather, stay cool by using fans and drinking cold drinks.  Keep air conditioners on and make sure that air is circulating throughout the room.  Dress in layers so you can peel them off as needed.

Vitamins E and C have been shown in studies to help reduce hot flashes.  One study supporting vitamin E was published in “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” and concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Extensive research indicates that vitamin C strengthens blood vessels and acts as a potent health enhancement.  In a study that combined vitamin C with bioflavonoids (the white matter on the inside of orange peels), 67% of the subjects reported complete relief from hot flashes.

The minerals calcium and magnesium can also help with deeper, sounder sleep, particularly because estrogen in women and testosterone in men helps to keep these minerals in circulation in the body and when these hormones are depleted, more frequent mineral supplementation is needed.

Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com is an example of a natural insomnia remedy that provides good results for menopause symptoms.  It contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie from Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and took them and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click here: http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Six Tips to Stay Asleep During the Night

Some people as they approach middle age may find it more difficult to stay asleep during the night.  They can fall asleep okay and the first part of their night is fine, but around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m., they find themselves habitually awake and unable to get back to sleep.  Here are some sleep tips that may help:

  1. Use a black eye mask to cover your eyes and use earplugs to keep the noise out.  A dark, cool room is most ideal to help the body produce melatonin, the hormone produced by the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycles.
  2. Get some sunlight by taking a walk during the day.  Being out in the sun will also set your wake-sleep cycle in a good way.  Additionally, the exercise and body movement helps with better, more restful sleep at night.
  3. If headaches or tension are keeping you up, try using some magnesium.  One German study found that 42 percent of the people taking magnesium reduced the duration and intensity of their migraine headaches.
  4. For females that experience hot flashes and night sweats during the night, take some extra steps to keep yourself and your bedroom cooler at night.  Wear lighter bedclothes, use less blankets, and you can also use a slightly damp washcloth on your forehead or neck.
  5. Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep, therefore highly absorbable calcium and magnesium supplements are effective.  The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis advises that during pre-menopause or menopause, the lack of estrogen and progesterone can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur such as irritability, leg cramps, insomnia, hot flashes and night sweats.
  6. It can work well for some people to take a calcium and magnesium supplement before bed and then again at the time of night they habitually wake up and are unable to go back to sleep.  This last tip just may be the clincher that finally puts one’s insomnia issue to rest.

This health information is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.  To learn more click here.

Study of Restless Legs Syndrome in Canada Finds it Runs in Families

By Jobee Knight

A study was recently published in the Archives of Neurology on Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).  RLS is a disruptive condition that affects the nervous system and up to 10% of the U.S. population have some form of it.  It results in an irresistible urge to move the legs, often accompanied by unpleasant sensations in the legs such as creeping, crawling, tingling, pulling or pain.  Because RLS most often occurs in the evening, it can disrupt sleep, contribute to insomnia, and reduce a person’s quality of life.

In the Montreal Canada study, RLS patients were followed up in a specialized sleep center for 15 years.  479 affected family members were assessed by their responses to a structured questionnaire.

The Results — the researchers data showed that RLS occurs in families, with 77% of those having the condition being in a family with other members who have it.  Siblings of a person who is severely afflicted with the condition are about 3.6 times more likely to have the disease than those without an affected sibling, and offspring of parents with the condition have 1.8 times the risk.

The researchers also write that RLS has an average duration of 24 years and is more prominent among women who also have an increased incidence of anemia or iron deficiency, arthritis, or a number of pregnancies.

Comment from the Blog Author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

One natural insomnia remedy showing good results with restless leg syndrome and insomnia is Sleep Minerals II, made by Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA.  This natural sleep remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, restless legs syndrome, heart health, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc, and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I just wanted to take the time to write and say that I have been taking your supplement “Sleep Minerals II” for about a month now. I can’t thank you enough. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing! I have suffered with insomnia and restless legs for 2 1/2 years now. I have not had one bad night since I started taking this. I have had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…..it’s gone for a month now. This has been a miracle for me!”

Visit this link to learn more about Sleep Minerals II.