Sleep Minerals II Customer Review on YouTube Video

Greetings to you,

The National Sleep Foundation reports that over sixty percent of Americans experience some form of insomnia, and that many of these are turning to sleep medications for some relief.  These drugs come with strong side effects and tend to lose their effectiveness over time.

Sleep Minerals II is the original calcium and magnesium based natural sleep aid. It’s been shown to be effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Turn up the volume on your computer and have a look at this interesting one and a half minute YouTube video review from a Sleep Minerals II customer:

For more information visit the Sleep Minerals II website.

Study Shows Calcium and Vitamin D Keep Bones Strong after Menopause

calcium magnesium bones insomniaAccording to the U.S. National Osteoporosis Foundation, women can lose up to 20% of their bone mass in the five to seven years after menopause, making them more susceptible to osteoporosis and fractures.

In a recent study from the British Medical Journal, it was confirmed that taking both calcium and vitamin D together on a daily basis significantly reduces the risk of bone fractures.

The research was based on a review of seven controlled trials comprising almost 70,000 people throughout the U.S. and Europe. These findings are important because this is one of the few studies to show that vitamin D alone does not reduce the risk of fracture.

John Robbins, a professor of internal medicine and co-author of the study says: “My earlier research in Sacramento included more than 1,000 healthy, postmenopausal women and concluded that taking calcium and vitamin D together helped them preserve bone health and prevent fractures. This latest analysis, because it incorporates so many more people, really confirms our earlier conclusions.”

The National Osteoporosis Foundation defines osteoporosis as porous bone; a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue.  This can lead to fragile bones and an increased susceptibility to fractures, especially of the hip, spine and wrist, although any bone can be affected.  The foundation estimates that 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, of which 80% are women and 20% men.

Regarding the use of calcium and vitamin D together, Robbins said: “This (recent) study supports a growing consensus that combined calcium and vitamin D is more effective than vitamin D alone in reducing a variety of fractures.  Interestingly, this combination of supplements benefits both women and men of all ages, which is not something we fully expected to find.”

In addition to strengthening bones, recent research has shown that calcium is also an effective insomnia remedy, as well as being an important agent to lower blood pressure, alleviate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and protect against colon cancer.  More and more nutritional supplements are being formulated with calcium and vitamin D because of their wide array of benefits.

In order to prevent a magnesium deficiency, supplements should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form is more digestible than tablets.  Softgels that are formulated with carrier oils such as rice bran oil have been shown to increase mineral absorption.  One formula that has these qualities is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.

Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after about a week, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends getting the daily-recommended amounts of calcium and vitamin D, engaging in regular weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercises, and avoiding smoking.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click this link.

Top 12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome

This helpful information on restless leg syndrome comes from the Editors of Consumer Guide:

It’s bad enough when you can’t get to sleep and you just lie there, staring at the ceiling. But people who suffer from restless legs syndrome don’t just lie there. They are seized by an uncontrollable urge to move their legs. Their legs actually twitch or jerk, while they experience the sensation of something squirming or wiggling under their skin. Consequently, restless legs syndrome can lead to problems associated with sleep deprivation, such as anxiety and depression.

Researchers say this is a condition still shrouded in much mystery.  Although there seem to be connections with other conditions — such as heart, lung, and kidney disorders: circulatory problems; and arthritis — the culprit sometimes appears to be as simple as excessive caffeine consumption or too little exercise.

The following home remedies are designed to help you combat this problem. If you find that you still have twitching legs after you’ve tried these tips, however, it’s time to get a medical evaluation.

1. Get up and walk. Walking around may be the only thing that helps. A midnight stroll through the house may calm your legs enough to keep them still when you go back to bed.

2. Check out your caffeine consumption. Coffee, tea, chocolate, sodas, and even over-the-c counter (OTC) medications may contain caffeine. Try cutting your consumption of caffeine-containing foods and medications (or substituting decaffeinated varieties) to see if your condition improves. Avoid tobacco, which contains the stimulant nicotine, and alcohol, which can have its own detrimental effects on sleep, as well.

3. Modify your medication. Some OTC medications, such as certain cold medications and allergy pills, contain mild stimulants that can result in jittery legs. Ask your pharmacist if any medications you are taking contain stimulants and whether there are any non-stimulating alternatives.

4. Take a bath. A warm bath or massage before bed relaxes muscles and therefore may be helpful.

5. Change your temperature. Sometimes, a change from hot to cold, or cold to hot, can do the trick. Try putting a heating pad or hot pack on your legs for a short while. If that doesn’t work, drape a cool towel over your legs, or dip your feet in cool water.

6. Make sure you’re eating well. There are some indications that a deficiency in iron, folate, or magnesium may contribute to restless legs syndrome. By eating a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods, you should get the vitamins and minerals you need. However, your doctor may recommend supplements of these specific nutrients.

7. Make a bedtime habit. Get into a regular routine that will help your mind and body settle down and prepare for bed.

8. Stick to a schedule. Getting to bed at about the same time each night and allowing for a full night’s sleep may help avoid the fatigue that could be a contributing factor to restless legs syndrome.

9. Soothe your stress. Stress may not be the cause of restless legs syndrome, but it can exacerbate it. Try to eliminate some of the stress in your life. Regular exercise and some form of relaxation technique or even an engaging in a hobby may help you “de-stress.”

10. Exercise your legs. Moderate exercise often helps, although excessive exercise can aggravate restless leg symptoms. A daily walk at a moderate pace is an excellent exercise, especially for folks who haven’t been very physically active in a while.

11. Stretch your legs.  Try stretching your calves, hamstrings (backs of the knees), and gluteal (butt) muscles before bed.

12. Wear socks to bed. Some experts have found that a lot of people who suffer from restless legs syndrome also seem to have cold feet. Although nobody has studied the connection, it might not hurt to bundle up your tootsies for the night.

……Additional comments from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

Studies have shown the mineral magnesium to be effective in helping to calm restless leg syndrome and insomnia.  This research appeared in the Romanian Journal of Neurology and the Journal Sleep.

Supplements should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form containing healthy carrier oils mixed with the minerals is more digestible than tablets or capsules, and provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

One formula that has these qualities and is gaining in popularity with restless leg syndrome sufferers is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for relaxation — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin d, zinc, and heart-healthy rice bran oil in a softgel.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

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Credit:  the Editors of Consumer Guide.  “12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome”  16 January 2007.  HowStuffWorks.com. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/home-remedies/home-remedies-for-restless-legs-syndrome.htm  23 July 13.

Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds – Top 11 Proven Ones

  • Fiber: 1.7 grams.
  • Carbs: 5 grams.
  • Protein: 7 grams.
  • Fat: 13 grams (6 of which are omega-6s).
  • Vitamin K: 18% of the RDI.
  • Phosphorous: 33% of the RDI.
  • Manganese: 42% of the RDI.
  • Magnesium: 37% of the RDI.
  • Iron: 23% of the RDI.
  • Zinc: 14% of the RDI.
  • Copper: 19% of the RDI.

They also contain lots of antioxidants and a decent amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids, potassium, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and folate.

Pumpkin seeds and seed oil also contain many other nutrients that have been shown to provide health benefits (2, 3).

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are rich in antioxidants, iron, zinc, magnesium and many other nutrients. An ounce (28 grams) contains about 151 calories.

2. High in Antioxidants

pumpkin seeedsPumpkin seeds contain antioxidants like carotenoids (the yellow, red, and orange colors in vegetables) and vitamin E.

Antioxidants can reduce inflammation and protect your cells from harmful free radicals. Because of this, consuming foods rich in antioxidants can help protect against many different diseases.

It is thought that the high levels of antioxidants in pumpkins seeds are partly responsible for their positive effects on health.

In one study, inflammation was reduced when rats with arthritis were given pumpkin seed oil. Rats given an anti-inflammatory drug experienced negative side effects, whereas rats given pumpkin seed oil had no side effects.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are full of antioxidants that may help protect against disease and reduce inflammation.

3. Linked to a Reduced Risk of Certain Cancers

Diets rich in pumpkin seeds have been associated with lower levels of stomach, breast, lung, prostate and colon cancers (5).

A large observational study found that eating them was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (9).

Others studies suggest that the lignans in pumpkin seeds may play a key role in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer (10). Lignans are special plant chemicals that can help to balance hormones.

Further test-tube studies found that a supplement containing pumpkin seeds had the potential to slow down the growth of prostate cancer cells.

Bottom Line: Some evidence suggests that pumpkin seeds may help to prevent certain cancers.

4. Improve Prostate and Bladder Health

Pumpkin seeds may help relieve symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition where the prostate gland enlarges and can cause problems with urination.

Several studies in humans found that eating these seeds reduced symptoms that are associated with BPH (13).

A study of over 1,400 men looked at the effects of consuming pumpkin seeds on BPH. After one year, men receiving them reported reduced symptoms and a better quality of life.

There is also research to suggest that taking pumpkin seeds or their products as supplements can help treat symptoms of an overactive bladder.

One study found that taking a supplement of 10 grams of pumpkin seed extract daily improved urinary function in 45 men and women with overactive bladders.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds may reduce symptoms of benign prostate enlargement and an overactive bladder.

5. Very High in Magnesium

magnesium pumpkin seedsPumpkin seeds are one of the best natural sources of magnesium. This is important, since magnesium deficiency is common in many Western countries.

In the US, around 79% of adults had a magnesium intake below the recommended daily amount.

Magnesium is necessary for more than 600 chemical reactions in the body. Adequate levels of magnesium are important for:

  • Controlling blood pressure
  • Reducing heart disease risk
  • Forming and maintaining healthy bones (19).
  • Regulating blood sugar levels

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are a rich source of magnesium. Healthy magnesium levels are important for your blood pressure, heart health, bone health and blood sugar levels.

6. May Improve Heart Health

Pumpkin seeds are a good source of antioxidants, magnesium, zinc and fatty acids, all of which may help keep your heart healthy.

Animal studies have also shown that pumpkin seed oil can help reduce high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels.

These are two important risk factors for heart disease.

A study involving 35 postmenopausal women found that pumpkin seed oil supplements reduced diastolic blood pressure by 7% and increased the “good” HDL cholesterol by 16% over a 12-week period (25).

Other studies suggest that it may be the nitric oxide enzymes contained in pumpkin seed oil that are responsible for its positive effects on heart health.

Nitric oxide helps expand blood vessels, improving blood flow and reducing the risk of plaque growth in the arteries.

Bottom Line: Nutrients in pumpkin seeds may help keep your heart healthy by reducing blood pressure and increasing good cholesterol.

7. Can Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Animal studies have shown that pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed powder and pumpkin juice can reduce blood sugar.

This is especially important for people with diabetes, who may struggle to control their blood sugar levels.

Several studies have found that supplementing the diet with pumpkin juice or seed powder reduced blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

The high magnesium content of pumpkin seeds may be responsible for its positive effect on diabetes.

An observational study involving over 127,000 men and women found that diets rich in magnesium were associated with a 33% lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men and a 34% lower risk in women.

More research is needed to confirm this beneficial effect on blood sugar levels.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds may help reduce blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed.

8. Very High in Fiber

Pumpkin seeds are a great source of dietary fiber. Whole seeds provide 5.2 grams of fiber in a single 1-oz (28-gram) serving.

However, pumpkin kernels with the shell removed contain 1.7 grams of fiber per ounce. These are the green pumpkin seeds available in most supermarkets.

A diet high in fiber can promote good digestive health.

In addition, high-fiber diets have been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Bottom Line: Whole pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of fiber. Diets high in fiber are associated with many health benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

9. May Improve Sperm Quality

Low zinc levels are associated with reduced sperm quality and an increased risk of infertility in men.

Since pumpkin seeds are a rich source of zinc, they may help improve sperm quality.

Evidence from one study in mice suggests they may also help protect human sperm from damage caused by chemotherapy and autoimmune diseases.

Pumpkin seeds are also high in antioxidants and other nutrients that can contribute to healthy testosterone levels and improve overall health.

Together, all these factors may benefit fertility levels and reproductive function, especially in men.

Bottom Line: The high zinc content of pumpkin seeds may help improve sperm quality and fertility in men.

10. May Help Improve Sleep

If you have trouble sleeping, you may want to eat some pumpkin seeds before bed. They’re a natural source of tryptophan, an amino acid that can help promote sleep.

Consuming around 1 gram of tryptophan daily is thought to help improve sleep.

However, you would need to eat around 7 oz (200 grams) of pumpkin seeds to get the necessary 1 gram of tryptophan.

The zinc in these seeds can also help convert tryptophan to serotonin, which is then changed into melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle.

In addition, pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of magnesium. Adequate magnesium levels have also been associated with better sleep (34).

Some small studies have found that taking a magnesium supplement improved sleep quality and total sleep time in people with low magnesium levels (35, 36).

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are a good source of tryptophan, zinc and magnesium, all of which help promote good sleep.

11. Easy to Add to Your Diet

If you’d like to experience the benefits of pumpkin seeds, they’re easy to incorporate into your diet.

In many countries, they’re a popular snack that can be eaten either raw or roasted, salted or unsalted.

As well as eating them alone, you can add them to smoothies or to Greek yogurt and fruit.

You could incorporate them into meals by sprinkling them into salads, soups or cereals. Some people use pumpkin seeds in baking, as an ingredient for sweet or savory bread and cakes.

However, as with many seeds and nuts, they contain phytic acid, which can reduce the bioavailability of some nutrients you eat.

If you eat seeds and nuts regularly, you may want to soak or sprout them to reduce the phytic acid content. Roasting them may also help.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds can be easily incorporated into the diet as a snack or as an additional ingredient in meals or baking.

Do Pumpkin Seeds Have Any Other Benefits?

The rich nutrient content of pumpkin seeds means they may provide many other health benefits, such as improved energy, mood and immune function.

Eating them can help solve dietary deficiencies and may protect against various health problems.

This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Article Source: https://authoritynutrition.com

Related Article: New Chart on the Benefits of Seeds: Flax, Chia, Pumpkin

What is pumpkin seed oil good for?

In one study, inflammation was reduced when animals with arthritis were given pumpkin seed oil. Pumpkin seed oil can also help reduce high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels. Studies show that the enzymes contained in pumpkin seed oil are responsible for its positive effects on heart health.

Is pumpkin seed oil good for hair or baldness?

Researchers from the Republic of Korea’s Pusan National University have confirmed that pumpkin seed oil increases hair growth among balding men. The treatment consisted of giving the patients 400 milligrams of pumpkin seed oil per day in capsules. The pumpkin seed oil group saw 30% to 40% increased hair counts while the placebo group showed 5-10% more hair counts.

Is pumpkin seed oil for breasts healthy for women?

Diets rich in pumpkin seeds have been associated with lower levels of stomach, breast, lung, prostate and colon cancers. One study found that eating them was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Lignans are special plant chemicals that can help to balance hormones. The lignans in pumpkin seeds may play a role in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

Menopause Hot Flashes Improved by Evening Primrose Oil and Minerals

evening primrose oil helps hot flashesEvening primrose oil comes from the seeds of a yellow wildflower that grows throughout the United States.

In a study from the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, researchers tested the effect of evening primrose oil on 56 menopausal women aged 45 to 59 with hot flashes.

The women were given two capsules per day of evening primrose oil (500 mg per capsule) for a continuous 6 weeks.  The results showed there was a 42% improvement in the severity of hot flashes, as well as beneficial improvements in their life activities.

Mineral supplements such as magnesium and calcium are also of good benefit to menopausal women with hot flashes and night sweats.  One example is a 2011 study from the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System.  Women with at least 14 hot flashes a week received 400 milligrams of magnesium oxide for 4 weeks, increasing to 800 mg. per day if needed.  At the end of the study, the magnesium supplements had reduced their frequency of hot flashes from 52 to 28 per week, a 41.4% reduction.  Fatigue, sweating, and distress were also significantly reduced.

One insomnia remedy that also helps with hot flashes and night sweats and is increasing in popularity among women in menopause is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better, and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after several days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

Natural menopause remedies are a healthier option for women with hot flashes, night sweats and insomnia.  For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Study Confirms Link Between Insomnia and Hot Flashes

insomnia hot flash remedyA team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California recently conducted a study to help determine the causes of insomnia among premenopausal and postmenopausal women.  The team conducted phone interviews with 982 women and gathered information about their sleep history, hot flashes and overall health.

They found that 51% of  postmenopausal women experienced hot flashes and 79% of premenopausal women had them.  Among the women with the most severe hot flashes (based on their intensity and frequency), 81% of them experienced sleeplessness and insomnia.

The lead researcher said: “In this paper, we have observed without any doubt and in a significant way that hot flashes are associated with insomnia. This is the first observational study showing the link between insomnia and hot flashes while controlling for other factors that could account for insomnia in women.”

Comment from the Blog Author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis discusses the many roles of calcium in women’s health in her book “Let’s Get Well” and says: “During the menopause, the lack of the ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone) causes severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur.  At these times, high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

One natural insomnia remedy gaining popularity with women and people of all ages is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale California.  Sleep Minerals II contains powerful forms of the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules,  and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. in Santa Clarita, CA says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia, it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired. I also had crawling and tingling feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and after a week of taking it, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/sleep-minerals-ii-effective-natural-sleep-aid-for-insomnia-nutrition-breakthroughs/

Top 8 Ways to Cool Off and Sleep Well in Summer Heat

Sleep better with Sleep Minerals II

These tips are for those of us who have sweated in our sheets on hot summer nights, unable to sleep.  In an ideal world, we would all have multiple air conditioners throughout our homes or central air conditioning to keep us cool.

In the actual world, not everyone has these, or even if they do, they may be looking for other helpful options in the case of being away from home or traveling to hot climates.

One question to ask would be whether or not any research studies have been done on the effects of body temperature on sleep.  Yes, in fact there have.  Researchers from the Cornel Medical Center in New York did a study showing that a cooler body temperature does indeed help sleep.  They identified the time at which the participant’s body temperature fell most sharply. This point almost always occurred in the two hours before sleep began.

So without further adieu, here are the creative tips for staying cool at night and sleeping well.

Tip #1 – People with trouble falling asleep might benefit from taking warm or hot baths about 90 minutes before bedtime, per the New York research study noted above.  When they get out of the bath, their body temperature will drop rapidly, and this should help them to fall asleep faster.  Another option for those with less time is to take a cool shower before bed.

Tip #2 –  Stick to loose clothing of cotton, linen or rayon and avoid synthetic fabrics and wool. Check into ‘Wicking Nightwear.’ These nightclothes are designed to whisk away sweat and moisture and keep you dry and comfortable while you sleep. Cotton sheets are best, rather than silk or other fabrics, as they stay cooler.

Tip #3 – Keep a thermos of ice water next to the bed and drink as needed.  The ice water can also be poured onto a washcloth and used on the forehead, legs, feet or other areas.  Another option is to put a hot water bottle in the freezer and use it as needed to stay cool.  Feet can set the pace for the rest of the body, so this may be a good place to put a cool washcloth.

Tip #4 – Try a ‘Chillow’ pillow insert.  The Chillow is filled with water and placed inside the pillowcase, on top of the pillow.  It absorbs and dissipates heat to keep you cooler and doesn’t require refrigeration.  It is comfortably cool, rather than cold and it always stays dry.

Tip #5 – Use some smart strategies for box fans and other fans.  Point a fan facing out the window so it will push the hot air outside, leaving cooler air in the room.  A do it yourself air conditioner can be made by putting a shallow pan of ice in front of a fan.  A cooling breeze will be created from the cold water as the ice melts.

Tip #6 – Put a blow-up air bed on the ground with some sheets and blankets and sleep on it.  This puts you closer to the floor where the air is cooler, as hot air rises.  If your bedroom is on a second floor, go the first floor to sleep.

Tip #7 – Keep the oven off and eat light meals that are cooling to the body such as fruit and vegetable salads, pasta salads, cold rice and veggies, or rice cakes with a slice of cheese, etc.  Delicious cold soups can be eaten such as split pea or lentil.

Tip #8 – Calcium is known to cool, soothe and relax the nervous system according to Chinese medicine.  In their system, a food’s temperature refers to the heating or cooling effect it has on the body once it has been ingested – rather than the temperature of the food when it is eaten.

For a cooling effect on the body during the night, take a well-absorbed form of calcium and magnesium before bed such as Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs. This natural sleep remedy contains unique forms of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and zinc.  It is formulated in a softgel with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Hot flashes and night sweats can be brought on by hot weather, as well as other causes such as hormonal changes, spicy foods or alcohol.  Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable. After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals II, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep. I have much less interruption from hot flashes, I‘m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Some other healthy advice would be to eat more of the calcium rich foods like cheese, almonds, spinach, parsley, beans, kale and broccoli.

In summary, make use of these tips to stay cool on hot summer nights, and you can also come up with some other similar ones of your own.  You’ll be happier the next day that you did!

B Vitamins Can Remedy Insomnia per Sleep Research Study

vitamins for sleepThose of us who have experienced insomnia know what its like to toss and turn through the night trying to get some good sleep.  And then the next day can be filled with brain fog, irritability, exhaustion and just not quite feeling like one’s usual self.  Some will turn to sleeping drugs, only to find the effects wearing off over time and the side effects strong.

On the other hand, nutrition can be one of the most essential supports and defenses in winning the battle to achieve calmer, deeper, longer sleep.  There are some vitamins and nutrients in particular that have been shown in research studies to soothe a person’s frequent awakenings and improve overall sleep.

B vitamins can come in very handy for those experiencing insomnia or restless leg syndrome (also known as RLS).  Those who have restless leg syndrome undergo unpleasant sensations in the legs described as creeping, crawling, tingling, pulling or painful. They often suffer with chronic insomnia and sleeplessness due to the strong urge to walk or do other activities to relieve sensations in their legs at night.

One study from the journal “Sleep Medicine” published the results of 28 elderly patients who had severe RLS with night time leg cramps that disturbed their sleep. They were given B complex capsules containing B-1, B-2, B-6 and B-12.  The study authors observed that after 3 months, 86% of the patients taking vitamin B supplements had prominent remission of leg cramps, whereas those taking the placebo had no significant difference.

In this study, treatment with vitamin B complex significantly reduced the frequency, intensity, and duration of night time leg cramps. Because vitamin B complex is a relatively safe and effective alternative to quinine, the main drug used for RLS, they feel that doctors should reconsider using drugs and change the usual treatment of choice for night time leg cramps.

One’s overall brain health is closely related to healthy sleep.  From the same study in “Sleep Medicine”, the authors noted that thiamine or vitamin B-1 deficiency can cause fatigue, weakness, intestinal symptoms, memory loss and disturbed sleep. They also point out that Parkinson’s disease sufferers generally have low levels of niacin or vitamin B-3, a deficiency of which can also cause insomnia and sleeplessness.

Another point from the article is that vitamin B-6 is a necessary co-factor in the creation of amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein.  The importance of this is that brain chemicals such as serotonin and melatonin are made out of the amino acids tryptophan.  Serotonin and melatonin have key roles in supporting good sleep and cannot be produced without enough B-6.  Even a mild deficiency of B-6 results in inhibited activity of these brain nutrients and may create insomnia.

Magnesium and calcium are long-time proven sleep remedies. A study on magnesium from the University of Medical Sciences in Iran was done with 46 adults who were experiencing insomnia. Two magnesium tablets twice a day (250 mg. each) resulted in significant increases in sleep time and reduced cortisol levels in the body, which is a stress hormone that can keep people awake.

Calcium is known to soothe sleeplessness and provide a deeper sleep.  In a report called “The Nutritional Relationships of Magnesium”, the author notes that the type of insomnia associated with a calcium deficiency often causes difficulty with falling asleep.  This same study says that: “Muscle cramps associated with calcium deficiency often occur at night and without exertion.  Such cramps usually involve the calves and thighs, but not the hands or feet.”

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural ingredients for relaxation and deeper sleep.

The result was Sleep Minerals II, a natural sleep aid which contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for sleep and relaxation: Calcium and magnesium, along with Vitamin D and zinc. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form along with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.  These minerals are also proven to help with restless leg syndrome, bone and muscle strength, teenage insomnia and menopause insomnia.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

In summary, make good use of natural vitamins and minerals as the first line of defense in the war against sleeplessness and insomnia.

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

 

15 Great Uses of Coconut Oil in the Bathroom: Soothe, Cleanse, Heal

coconut oil for bathroom

By Dr. Joseph Mercola, a physician trained in both traditional and natural medicine
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Shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs,
maker of the effective calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II
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While multiple companies manufacture and market “new and improved” fast-moving consumer goods that we use every day, such as soap, toothpaste, deodorant and body lotion, one of the best and most natural products has been right under our noses, so to speak.

Coconut oil has a pleasant scent, and besides being very economical, it’s an amazingly versatile and therapeutic substance. Since the mid-1990s, roughly, coconut oil has been used for a number of applications, such as cleansing, deodorizing and healing, and this has been growing on the larger population.

Questions like “Where does coconut oil actually come from?” and “What does it smell like?” are apropos. Coconut oil, like butter, is a solid substance, melting to a liquid form when it reaches about 76 degrees.

Insoluble at room temperature, it takes on a creamy consistency when blended with water using a whisk. If not treated to processes such as bleaching, refining or deodorizing, coconut oil exudes the mild fragrance you would expect — like coconut.

2 Kinds of Coconut Oil — Commercial Grade and Virgin

The relatively recent interest in the many uses of coconut oil also elicits questions regarding its production. There are two basic types: Commercial-grade and virgin coconut oil.

Commercial grade coconut oil — This product is made from copra, which is the dried meat of the coconut. It’s usually smoke-, sun- or kiln (oven) -dried or a combination of the three. But when standard copra is used to make coconut oil, it’s not sterile and therefore unsuitable for human consumption.

It’s “purified” or refined through a process known as RBD — refined, bleached and deodorized. According to Coconutdiet.com:

“High heat is used to deodorize the oil, and the oil is typically filtered through (bleaching) clays to remove impurities. Sodium hydroxide is generally used to remove free fatty acids and prolong shelf life.

This is the most common way to mass-produce coconut oil. The older way of producing refined coconut oil was through physical/mechanical refining. More modern methods also use chemical solvents to extract all the oil from the copra for higher yields.”

Virgin coconut oil — In comparison, like olive oil, coconut oil is best when “first-pressed” and “virgin.” Like pressing a teabag that’s been steeping in boiled water for a few minutes, the first water released will contain the most actual extracts.

The second time it’s pressed, as in the teabag analogy, the result isn’t as concentrated. Coconutdiet.com continues:

“Virgin Coconut Oil can only be achieved by using fresh coconut meat or what is called non-copra. Chemicals and high heating are not used in further refining, since the natural, pure coconut oil is very stable with a shelf life of several years.

There are currently two main processes of manufacturing Virgin Coconut Oil:

    • Quick drying of fresh coconut meat which is then used to press out the oil. Using this method, minimal heat is used to quick dry the coconut meat, and the oil is then pressed out via mechanical means.
    • Wet-milling. With this method, the oil is extracted from fresh coconut meat without drying first. ‘Coconut milk’ is expressed first by pressing.

The oil is then further separated from the water. Methods which can be used to separate the oil from the water include boiling, fermentation, refrigeration, enzymes and mechanical centrifuge (swirling around).”

Why Keep Coconut Oil in the Bathroom?

Raw, organic coconut oil, besides being good enough to eat (which we’ll discuss in a minute) has a plethora of benefits apart from actual ingestion. Here’s a list of 15 benefits of coconut oil, in no particular order:

1.Smooth shave — If you’ve been plagued by red, irritated and razor-burned skin after shaving, coconut oil is both soothing and antibacterial.

2.Rash recovery — Other rash problems from diaper rash to mild allergic reactions can be remedied using coconut oil. Propylene glycol is one chemical found in commercial moisturizers that can cause skin irritation and dermatitis.

3.Lip balm — Use coconut oil to moisturize, nourish and hydrate chapped lips without inadvertently eating endocrine disruptors.

A study on the metal content in lip balm revealed lead, aluminum, cadmium, chromium and manganese in high concentrations, some associated with reproductive, developmental or other adverse health effects.

4.Facial cleanser — Effective as a face wash, mixing equal parts coconut oil and castor oil is known as oil cleansing. Massage it into your skin and remove gently with a warm washcloth.

Ninety percent of the body washes and cleansers you buy contain harmful chemicals such as sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate, which, in combination with other chemicals, can form cancer-causing nitrosamines (harmful chemicals). Coconut oil can even improve acne.

5.Makeup remover — Not only can you cleanse your face, you can remove use it as a natural makeup remover — even stubborn mascara and eyeliner.

6.Night cream — While you may not want to use coconut oil under makeup, applying it lightly before bed will hydrate your skin because its fatty acids form a natural emollient. If the skin around your nails is hard and peeling, treat your cuticles to a soothing coconut oil rub to keep them soft.

7.Deodorant — A tiny dab of coconut mixed, if you desire, with an essential oil such as lavender is very effective — so much better than the antiperspirants containing aluminum, which is linked to Alzheimer’s.

Another deodorant recipe combines 3 tablespoons each of coconut oil, arrowroot powder (or cornstarch) and baking soda.

8.Foot fungus fighter — Because it’s antimicrobial and antibacterial, coconut is very effective in combating athlete’s foot. Rub it on the bottoms of your feet after every shower.

Antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal compounds in coconut oil have been shown to inactivate microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and fungi.

9.Soothing bath — As an alternative to bubble baths that may induce urinary tract infections, especially in children, drop a dollop of coconut oil in your bath with a few essential oils. It’s both moisturizing and helps kill bacteria.

10.Body scrub — Combining equal parts coconut oil with sea salt, sugar or baking soda to make a homemade scrub softens, smooths and moisturizes your skin.

11.Body lotion — Moisturizers you buy at the store typically contain harmful chemicals such as aluminum, phthalates, parabens, formaldehyde and propylene glycol. Coconut is a fragrant, moisturizing alternative containing none of these.

12.Toothpaste — To combat tooth decay and even whiten teeth, make a DIY coconut oil toothpaste by mixing 1 teaspoon with 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 2 drops of peppermint essential oil. Just brush as usual.

13.Oil pulling — An oral rinse works much like a mouthwash, only you shouldn’t gargle with it. As you swish vigorously for five to 15 minutes, it penetrates the soft tissue between your gums and “pulls out” bacteria that causes cavities, plaque and bad breath.

14.When applied to infected cuts or wounds, coconut oil develops a layer of naturally protective chemicals that also keep out dust, fungi, bacteria and viruses. Applied to bruises, it speeds up the healing process in damaged tissues.

15.Frizz fighter — People with hair that tends to frizz often turn to silicone- or alcohol-based gels and mousses, which coat the hair, prevent it from absorbing moisture and dries out the hair shaft. Just a few drops of coconut oil are all you need for a natural hair conditioner for smooth, silky shine.

Healing Properties of Coconut Oil

Virgin coconut oil has been described as having a “haunting, nutty, vanilla flavor (and) even milder and richer-tasting than butter.” A New York Times article noted that coconut oil, while once demonized by the “all saturated fats are bad for you” camp, has now become accepted:

“The main saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid (easy to absorb). Lauric acid increases levels of the good fats, “HDL”, or high-density lipoprotein, and also bad LDL, or low-density lipoprotein (cholesterol), in the blood, but is not thought to negatively affect the overall ratio of the two.

… Any number of health claims have been made for lauric acid. According to proponents, it’s a wonder substance with possible antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral properties that could also, in theory, combat H.I.V., clear up acne and speed up your metabolism.”

Even applied topically, coconut oil has healing properties. One interesting factoid is that while antiperspirants containing aluminum are associated with Alzheimer’s, coconut oil actually prevents it because of the medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) that are easily absorbed and metabolized by the liver and can convert to ketones. One study noted:

“Ketone bodies are an important alternative energy source in the brain, and may be beneficial to people developing or already with memory impairment, as in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) … (It may also) be beneficial in the treatment of obesity, dyslipidaemia (higher fats in the blood), elevated LDL (cholesterol), insulin resistance and hypertension — these are the risk factors for (heart disease) and type 2 diabetes, and also for Alzheimer’s.”

Alzheimer’s is projected to affect 1 in 4 Americans in the next generation, rivaling obesity and diabetes, but evidence suggests that ketone bodies in coconut oil may help restore and renew neurons and nerve function in your brain, even after damage has set in.

Unhealthy Alternatives to Coconut Oil

Regarding coconut oil in the kitchen, even as a household cleaner, there are a few points to consider:

Virgin coconut oil has a smoke point of 350 degrees, so for cooking, it’s best used at lower temperatures. Olive oil overcooks even as low as 250 degrees, which may cause oxidization, doing your body more harm than good.

You can substitute coconut oil for butter or olive oil, and most definitely instead of so-called vegetable oils. Here’s why:

Multiple studies reveal coconut oil to impart amazing benefits when used in nutritional applications. One of the most dramatic changes you can make in your health will be to replace the so-called “healthy” vegetable, soy, corn and cottonseed oils such as canola when sautéing food or baking cake or cookies.

It’s interesting to note that Polynesian populations, who’ve been using full-fat coconut oil as a diet staple for untold generations, have no heart disease to speak of. Why? It’s a direct contradiction to what conventional medicine touted for a few decades, that saturated fats are bad for you, and will lead to obesity, high cholesterol levels, heart disease and Alzheimer’s.

The truth is, saturated fat like that of coconut oil and olive oil is natural, not the concocted substances created in a laboratory using methods like hydrogenation and partial hydrogenation that convert polyunsaturated fatty acids to unhealthy trans fats. Vegetable and seed oils undergo the double whammy of hydrogen atoms and high heat, creating a cheaper oil with a long shelf life that’s very bad for your health.

Further, when vegetable oils are heated to a high temperature, the chemical compounds break down, get “stuck” in your cells, oxidize (create excess oxygen) and create dangerous free radicals (molecules with oxygen) that can lead to disease.

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So, make good use of coconut oil in your bathroom (and also your kitchen!) and benefit from its many effective uses.  This article is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective calcium,magnesium and vitamin D based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

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Surprising Health Benefits of Body Fat – from Nutrition Breakthroughs

benefits of body fatGreetings to you,

Having some body fat provides benefits in maintaining the health of the body.  The chart below has some of the key ones.  One example is that having some body fat helps one to absorb and store the vital fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.  It also cushions the organs and protects them.

Fat helps the body store energy, helps keep the body warm, and is the raw material for making all of our hormones.  In an article from the journal “Endocrinology – An Integrated Approach” (endocrinology deals with the glands and hormones), the author writes that all hormones are made of fats such as cholesterol.  This includes estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, adrenal gland hormones, vitamin D, and the sleep hormone melatonin.

Eating healthy fats with our meals can play a vital role in helping us sleep better and achieve greater health.  Milk is well-known for its positive effects on inducing sleep, and dairy foods contain beneficial fats (although for some, fermented dairy such as yogurt is easier to digest). Dairy is also high in the sleep nutrients calcium, magnesium and vitamin D.  The best fats to eat are nutrient rich foods like eggs, natural butter and cheese, salmon, sardines, cod liver oil, avocados and coconut oil.

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and zinc in a softgel, mixed with natural rice bran oil for complete absorption.

A review of Sleep Minerals II on InsomniaReport says: “Nutrition Breakthroughs Sleep Minerals II seems like a decent product. It is made from natural ingredients and gives users a boost of important vitamins. It is also priced well, as it is in the price range of other sleep aid medications, but it can last twice as long depending on how many capsules are taken per night.”

Have a look at the chart below on the benefits of having some body fat.  And if you or someone you care about has sleeplessness or insomnia, check out the Sleep Minerals II page.

To your health,

Jobee Knight
Nutrition Breakthroughs

Shared with you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of Sleep Minerals II