Sleep Minerals II Customer Review on YouTube Video

Greetings to you,

The National Sleep Foundation reports that over sixty percent of Americans experience some form of insomnia, and that many of these are turning to sleep medications for some relief.  These drugs come with strong side effects and tend to lose their effectiveness over time.

Sleep Minerals II is the original calcium and magnesium based natural sleep aid. It’s been shown to be effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Turn up the volume on your computer and have a look at this interesting one and a half minute YouTube video review from a Sleep Minerals II customer:

For more information visit the Sleep Minerals II website.

Study Shows Calcium and Vitamin D Keep Bones Strong after Menopause

calcium magnesium bones insomniaAccording to the U.S. National Osteoporosis Foundation, women can lose up to 20% of their bone mass in the five to seven years after menopause, making them more susceptible to osteoporosis and fractures.

In a recent study from the British Medical Journal, it was confirmed that taking both calcium and vitamin D together on a daily basis significantly reduces the risk of bone fractures.

The research was based on a review of seven controlled trials comprising almost 70,000 people throughout the U.S. and Europe. These findings are important because this is one of the few studies to show that vitamin D alone does not reduce the risk of fracture.

John Robbins, a professor of internal medicine and co-author of the study says: “My earlier research in Sacramento included more than 1,000 healthy, postmenopausal women and concluded that taking calcium and vitamin D together helped them preserve bone health and prevent fractures. This latest analysis, because it incorporates so many more people, really confirms our earlier conclusions.”

The National Osteoporosis Foundation defines osteoporosis as porous bone; a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue.  This can lead to fragile bones and an increased susceptibility to fractures, especially of the hip, spine and wrist, although any bone can be affected.  The foundation estimates that 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, of which 80% are women and 20% men.

Regarding the use of calcium and vitamin D together, Robbins said: “This (recent) study supports a growing consensus that combined calcium and vitamin D is more effective than vitamin D alone in reducing a variety of fractures.  Interestingly, this combination of supplements benefits both women and men of all ages, which is not something we fully expected to find.”

In addition to strengthening bones, recent research has shown that calcium is also an effective insomnia remedy, as well as being an important agent to lower blood pressure, alleviate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and protect against colon cancer.  More and more nutritional supplements are being formulated with calcium and vitamin D because of their wide array of benefits.

In order to prevent a magnesium deficiency, supplements should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form is more digestible than tablets.  Softgels that are formulated with carrier oils such as rice bran oil have been shown to increase mineral absorption.  One formula that has these qualities is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.

Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly assimilated than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after about a week, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends getting the daily-recommended amounts of calcium and vitamin D, engaging in regular weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercises, and avoiding smoking.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click this link.

Study Shows Consistent Sleep Gives a Healthy Weight

Sleep better with Sleep Minerals IINews from ScienceDaily .com
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Shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs,
maker of Sleep Minerals II
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Prior research has shown not getting enough sleep can impact your weight, but new research from Brigham Young University in Utah finds the consistency of your bed time and wake time can also influence body fat.

Exercise science professor Bruce Bailey studied more than 300 women from two major Western U.S. universities over the course of several weeks and found that those with the best sleeping habits had healthier weights.

The main findings from the study, published online in the American Journal of Health Promotion revealed that a consistent bed time and, especially, a consistent wake time are related to lower body fat.  Getting less than 6.5 or more than 8.5 hours of sleep per night is associated with higher body fat.  Quality of sleep is important for body composition.

Women in the study were first assessed for body composition, and then were given an activity tracker to record their movements during the day and their sleep patterns at night. Researchers tracked sleep patterns of the participants for one week.

The most surprising finding from the study, according to the researchers, was the link between bed time and wake time consistency and body weight. Study participants who went to bed and woke up at, or around the same time each day had lower body fat. Those with more than 90 minutes of variation in sleep and wake time during the week had higher body fat than those with less than 60 minutes of variation.

Wake time was particularly linked to body fat: Those who woke up at the same time each morning had lower body fat. Staying up late and even sleeping in may be doing more harm than good, professor Bailey said.

“We have these internal clocks and throwing them off and not allowing them to get into a pattern does have an impact on our physiology,” Bailey said.  Bailey related consistent sleep patterns to having good sleep practices. When sleep practices are altered, it can influence physical activity patterns, and affect some of the hormones related to food consumption contributing to excess body fat.

Bailey and his team also found there was a sweet spot for amount of sleep: Those who slept between 8 and 8.5 hours per night had the lowest body fat.  Sleep quality also proved to have a strong relationship to body fat. Sleep quality is a measure of how effective sleep is, or how much time spent in bed is spent sleeping. Those who had better sleep quality had lower body fat.

To improve sleep quality Bailey recommends exercising, keeping the temperature in the room cool, having a quiet room, having a dark room, and using beds only for sleeping.

A note from Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of Sleep Minerals II.  The minerals calcium and magnesium are also well-known remedies for insomnia and increasing the quality and quantity of sleep.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of these minerals and is effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

K. C. of Homer, New York says: “I am writing to you a true believer of Sleep Minerals II.  I never write product reviews…. good or bad.  I had originally ordered the sleep minerals product and thought I would give it a try.  Well I had given it to the entire family.  We ran out of it and I really thought it wasn’t working.  I quickly realized within a couple nights that without them the entire household was not falling asleep as easily as they were before!  So I immediately ordered more.”

In summary, to have a shapelier figure, aim for getting 8 to 8 1/2 hours of sleep a night and for waking up at the same time each morning.  And support yourself in this quest with the highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium in Sleep Minerals II.

 

Article source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118133050.htm

Research on Health Benefits of Water: Weight Loss, Headache Relief

Water health benefitsSometimes just taking a drink of pure, fresh water can lighten our spirit and improve our health. Hydration means to supply with ample fluid or moisture. Studies are finding that being well-hydrated with water can assist with weight loss, help relieve fatigue and migraines, and improve mood and concentration.

Water is vital to life and ranges from 75% of body weight in infants to 55% of body weight in the elderly. The more water we drink, the better it circulates through the body, bringing essential nutrients and vitamins to places they are needed and flushing out toxins.

Water provides its health benefits without calories or sugar and actually comes in many forms such as spring water, carbonated water, mineral water, distilled water and well water. It is present in soups, stews, and teas, and is found within the most beneficial of all foods: vegetables and fruits.

Water is gaining attention for its ability to be an appetite-controller that has no side effects, costs very little and requires no prescription. In a study from the American Chemical Society, participants aged 55 to 75 all ate a low-calorie diet during the study. They were divided into two groups — one of the two groups drank 2 cups of water prior to their meals and the other didn’t. Over the course of the 12-week study, the water-drinkers lost five more pounds than the non-water drinkers.

Researchers from the Netherlands set out to prove the common notion that dehydration is considered to result in headaches and they studied 18 patients with migraine headaches. One group was given a placebo and the other was instructed to increase their daily intake of water. In the group that increased their intake of water by a quart a day, the total overall hours of headache were reduced by 21 hours in 2 weeks.

An easy way to increase the water intake is to fill a container with a quart of water and bring it along to drink throughout the day. Avoid tap water and use the filtered, spring or distilled varieties. Eating more raw fruits and vegetables is another key strategy; not only because of their high water content, but because of the plant chemicals they contain. Known as “phytochemicals”, these active nutrients provide the colors of the plants and give benefits to the heart, eyes, hormones and more.

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid featuring calcium and magnesium Sleep Minerals II, and Joints and More, the natural solution for joint relief, hair growth, allergies and more energy.

Top 12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome

This helpful information on restless leg syndrome comes from the Editors of Consumer Guide:

It’s bad enough when you can’t get to sleep and you just lie there, staring at the ceiling. But people who suffer from restless legs syndrome don’t just lie there. They are seized by an uncontrollable urge to move their legs. Their legs actually twitch or jerk, while they experience the sensation of something squirming or wiggling under their skin. Consequently, restless legs syndrome can lead to problems associated with sleep deprivation, such as anxiety and depression.

Researchers say this is a condition still shrouded in much mystery.  Although there seem to be connections with other conditions — such as heart, lung, and kidney disorders: circulatory problems; and arthritis — the culprit sometimes appears to be as simple as excessive caffeine consumption or too little exercise.

The following home remedies are designed to help you combat this problem. If you find that you still have twitching legs after you’ve tried these tips, however, it’s time to get a medical evaluation.

1. Get up and walk. Walking around may be the only thing that helps. A midnight stroll through the house may calm your legs enough to keep them still when you go back to bed.

2. Check out your caffeine consumption. Coffee, tea, chocolate, sodas, and even over-the-c counter (OTC) medications may contain caffeine. Try cutting your consumption of caffeine-containing foods and medications (or substituting decaffeinated varieties) to see if your condition improves. Avoid tobacco, which contains the stimulant nicotine, and alcohol, which can have its own detrimental effects on sleep, as well.

3. Modify your medication. Some OTC medications, such as certain cold medications and allergy pills, contain mild stimulants that can result in jittery legs. Ask your pharmacist if any medications you are taking contain stimulants and whether there are any non-stimulating alternatives.

4. Take a bath. A warm bath or massage before bed relaxes muscles and therefore may be helpful.

5. Change your temperature. Sometimes, a change from hot to cold, or cold to hot, can do the trick. Try putting a heating pad or hot pack on your legs for a short while. If that doesn’t work, drape a cool towel over your legs, or dip your feet in cool water.

6. Make sure you’re eating well. There are some indications that a deficiency in iron, folate, or magnesium may contribute to restless legs syndrome. By eating a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods, you should get the vitamins and minerals you need. However, your doctor may recommend supplements of these specific nutrients.

7. Make a bedtime habit. Get into a regular routine that will help your mind and body settle down and prepare for bed.

8. Stick to a schedule. Getting to bed at about the same time each night and allowing for a full night’s sleep may help avoid the fatigue that could be a contributing factor to restless legs syndrome.

9. Soothe your stress. Stress may not be the cause of restless legs syndrome, but it can exacerbate it. Try to eliminate some of the stress in your life. Regular exercise and some form of relaxation technique or even an engaging in a hobby may help you “de-stress.”

10. Exercise your legs. Moderate exercise often helps, although excessive exercise can aggravate restless leg symptoms. A daily walk at a moderate pace is an excellent exercise, especially for folks who haven’t been very physically active in a while.

11. Stretch your legs.  Try stretching your calves, hamstrings (backs of the knees), and gluteal (butt) muscles before bed.

12. Wear socks to bed. Some experts have found that a lot of people who suffer from restless legs syndrome also seem to have cold feet. Although nobody has studied the connection, it might not hurt to bundle up your tootsies for the night.

……Additional comments from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

Studies have shown the mineral magnesium to be effective in helping to calm restless leg syndrome and insomnia.  This research appeared in the Romanian Journal of Neurology and the Journal Sleep.

Supplements should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form containing healthy carrier oils mixed with the minerals is more digestible than tablets or capsules, and provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

One formula that has these qualities and is gaining in popularity with restless leg syndrome sufferers is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for relaxation — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin d, zinc, and heart-healthy rice bran oil in a softgel.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

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Credit:  the Editors of Consumer Guide.  “12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome”  16 January 2007.  HowStuffWorks.com. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/home-remedies/home-remedies-for-restless-legs-syndrome.htm  23 July 13.

Top 11 Proven Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds

  • Fiber: 1.7 grams.
  • Carbs: 5 grams.
  • Protein: 7 grams.
  • Fat: 13 grams (6 of which are omega-6s).
  • Vitamin K: 18% of the RDI.
  • Phosphorous: 33% of the RDI.
  • Manganese: 42% of the RDI.
  • Magnesium: 37% of the RDI.
  • Iron: 23% of the RDI.
  • Zinc: 14% of the RDI.
  • Copper: 19% of the RDI.

They also contain lots of antioxidants and a decent amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids, potassium, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and folate.

Pumpkin seeds and seed oil also contain many other nutrients that have been shown to provide health benefits (2, 3).

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are rich in antioxidants, iron, zinc, magnesium and many other nutrients. An ounce (28 grams) contains about 151 calories.

2. High in Antioxidants

pumpkin seeedsPumpkin seeds contain antioxidants like carotenoids (the yellow, red, and orange colors in vegetables) and vitamin E.

Antioxidants can reduce inflammation and protect your cells from harmful free radicals. Because of this, consuming foods rich in antioxidants can help protect against many different diseases.

It is thought that the high levels of antioxidants in pumpkins seeds are partly responsible for their positive effects on health.

In one study, inflammation was reduced when rats with arthritis were given pumpkin seed oil. Rats given an anti-inflammatory drug experienced negative side effects, whereas rats given pumpkin seed oil had no side effects.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are full of antioxidants that may help protect against disease and reduce inflammation.

3. Linked to a Reduced Risk of Certain Cancers

Diets rich in pumpkin seeds have been associated with lower levels of stomach, breast, lung, prostate and colon cancers (5).

A large observational study found that eating them was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (9).

Others studies suggest that the lignans in pumpkin seeds may play a key role in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer (10). Lignans are special plant chemicals that can help to balance hormones.

Further test-tube studies found that a supplement containing pumpkin seeds had the potential to slow down the growth of prostate cancer cells.

Bottom Line: Some evidence suggests that pumpkin seeds may help to prevent certain cancers.

4. Improve Prostate and Bladder Health

Pumpkin seeds may help relieve symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition where the prostate gland enlarges and can cause problems with urination.

Several studies in humans found that eating these seeds reduced symptoms that are associated with BPH (13).

A study of over 1,400 men looked at the effects of consuming pumpkin seeds on BPH. After one year, men receiving them reported reduced symptoms and a better quality of life.

There is also research to suggest that taking pumpkin seeds or their products as supplements can help treat symptoms of an overactive bladder.

One study found that taking a supplement of 10 grams of pumpkin seed extract daily improved urinary function in 45 men and women with overactive bladders.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds may reduce symptoms of benign prostate enlargement and an overactive bladder.

5. Very High in Magnesium

magnesium pumpkin seedsPumpkin seeds are one of the best natural sources of magnesium. This is important, since magnesium deficiency is common in many Western countries.

In the US, around 79% of adults had a magnesium intake below the recommended daily amount.

Magnesium is necessary for more than 600 chemical reactions in the body. Adequate levels of magnesium are important for:

  • Controlling blood pressure
  • Reducing heart disease risk
  • Forming and maintaining healthy bones (19).
  • Regulating blood sugar levels

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are a rich source of magnesium. Healthy magnesium levels are important for your blood pressure, heart health, bone health and blood sugar levels.

6. May Improve Heart Health

Pumpkin seeds are a good source of antioxidants, magnesium, zinc and fatty acids, all of which may help keep your heart healthy.

Animal studies have also shown that pumpkin seed oil can help reduce high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels.

These are two important risk factors for heart disease.

A study involving 35 postmenopausal women found that pumpkin seed oil supplements reduced diastolic blood pressure by 7% and increased the “good” HDL cholesterol by 16% over a 12-week period (25).

Other studies suggest that it may be the nitric oxide enzymes contained in pumpkin seed oil that are responsible for its positive effects on heart health.

Nitric oxide helps expand blood vessels, improving blood flow and reducing the risk of plaque growth in the arteries.

Bottom Line: Nutrients in pumpkin seeds may help keep your heart healthy by reducing blood pressure and increasing good cholesterol.

7. Can Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Animal studies have shown that pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed powder and pumpkin juice can reduce blood sugar.

This is especially important for people with diabetes, who may struggle to control their blood sugar levels.

Several studies have found that supplementing the diet with pumpkin juice or seed powder reduced blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

The high magnesium content of pumpkin seeds may be responsible for its positive effect on diabetes.

An observational study involving over 127,000 men and women found that diets rich in magnesium were associated with a 33% lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men and a 34% lower risk in women.

More research is needed to confirm this beneficial effect on blood sugar levels.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds may help reduce blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed.

8. Very High in Fiber

Pumpkin seeds are a great source of dietary fiber. Whole seeds provide 5.2 grams of fiber in a single 1-oz (28-gram) serving.

However, pumpkin kernels with the shell removed contain 1.7 grams of fiber per ounce. These are the green pumpkin seeds available in most supermarkets.

A diet high in fiber can promote good digestive health.

In addition, high-fiber diets have been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Bottom Line: Whole pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of fiber. Diets high in fiber are associated with many health benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

9. May Improve Sperm Quality

Low zinc levels are associated with reduced sperm quality and an increased risk of infertility in men.

Since pumpkin seeds are a rich source of zinc, they may help improve sperm quality.

Evidence from one study in mice suggests they may also help protect human sperm from damage caused by chemotherapy and autoimmune diseases.

Pumpkin seeds are also high in antioxidants and other nutrients that can contribute to healthy testosterone levels and improve overall health.

Together, all these factors may benefit fertility levels and reproductive function, especially in men.

Bottom Line: The high zinc content of pumpkin seeds may help improve sperm quality and fertility in men.

10. May Help Improve Sleep

If you have trouble sleeping, you may want to eat some pumpkin seeds before bed. They’re a natural source of tryptophan, an amino acid that can help promote sleep.

Consuming around 1 gram of tryptophan daily is thought to help improve sleep.

However, you would need to eat around 7 oz (200 grams) of pumpkin seeds to get the necessary 1 gram of tryptophan.

The zinc in these seeds can also help convert tryptophan to serotonin, which is then changed into melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle.

In addition, pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of magnesium. Adequate magnesium levels have also been associated with better sleep (34).

Some small studies have found that taking a magnesium supplement improved sleep quality and total sleep time in people with low magnesium levels (35, 36).

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds are a good source of tryptophan, zinc and magnesium, all of which help promote good sleep.

11. Easy to Add to Your Diet

If you’d like to experience the benefits of pumpkin seeds, they’re easy to incorporate into your diet.

In many countries, they’re a popular snack that can be eaten either raw or roasted, salted or unsalted.

As well as eating them alone, you can add them to smoothies or to Greek yogurt and fruit.

You could incorporate them into meals by sprinkling them into salads, soups or cereals. Some people use pumpkin seeds in baking, as an ingredient for sweet or savory bread and cakes.

However, as with many seeds and nuts, they contain phytic acid, which can reduce the bioavailability of some nutrients you eat.

If you eat seeds and nuts regularly, you may want to soak or sprout them to reduce the phytic acid content. Roasting them may also help.

Bottom Line: Pumpkin seeds can be easily incorporated into the diet as a snack or as an additional ingredient in meals or baking.

Do Pumpkin Seeds Have Any Other Benefits?

The rich nutrient content of pumpkin seeds means they may provide many other health benefits, such as improved energy, mood and immune function.

Eating them can help solve dietary deficiencies and may protect against various health problems.

This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Article Source: https://authoritynutrition.com

Related Article: New Chart on the Benefits of Seeds: Flax, Chia, Pumpkin

How Blocking Blue Light at Night Can Transform Your Sleep

Blue light at computerBy Kris Gunnars, CEO and Founder of Authority Nutrition, BSc (Bachelor’s Degree in Medicine)
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Shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs,
maker of the effective calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II **************************************

Sleep is highly underrated.

It is one of the “pillars” of optimal health… just as important as diet and exercise.

Poor sleep is linked to heart disease, type 2 diabetes and depression. It is also one of the strongest risk factors for obesity.

The problem is that humans are sleeping much less than they did in the past.

But that’s not the end of it, unfortunately… the quality of our sleep has suffered as well.

It turns out that perhaps the single biggest contributor to our collective sleep problems, is the use of artificial lighting and electronics at night.

These devices emit light of a blue wavelength, which tricks our brains into thinking that it is daytime.

Numerous studies suggest that blue light in the evening disrupts the brain’s natural sleep-wake cycles, which are crucial for optimal function of the body.

Fortunately, this problem has a simple solution and there are a few actionable steps you can take to get rid of that blue light in the evening, potentially improving your health at the same time.

Let me explain how that works…

Blue Light is Crucial in The Daytime… But a Disaster at Night

Orange Clock

Our bodies have an internal “clock” that is situated in the brain.

This clock regulates our circadian rhythm, the 24-hour biological cycle that influences many internal functions

Most importantly, it determines when our bodies are primed to stay awake and be productive, and when we feel tired and want to go to sleep.

The circadian rhythm isn’t 100% accurate. Sometimes it is a bit longer than 24 hours, sometimes a bit shorter.

For this reason, it needs signals from the external environment in order to adjust itself. The most important signals that adjust this internal clock are daylight and darkness.

This actually makes perfect sense… throughout evolution, brightness meant that it was daytime and that we should be awake and get stuff done, while darkness meant that it was time to sleep and recover.

But not all light is equal, it is primarily light of a blue wavelength (blue light) that stimulates sensors in the eye to send signals to the brain’s internal clock.

Keep in mind that sunlight and white light contain a mixture of various wavelengths. There is a lot of blue light within.

Getting blue light (especially from the sun) in the daytime is very important. It helps us to stay alert, while improving performance and mood.

There has even been some success using blue light therapy devices to treat depression, and blue light bulbs in an office can reduce fatigue and improve the mood, performance and sleep of workers.

But even though blue light is incredibly beneficial during the day, it can be a complete disaster if we are exposed to it in the evening.

The problem is that modern light bulbs and electronic devices (especially computer monitors), also produce large amounts of blue light and “trick” our brains into thinking that it is daytime.

When it gets dark in the evening, a part of the brain called the pineal gland secretes the hormone melatonin, which signals to our bodies and brains that it is time to get tired and go to sleep.

Blue light, whether from the sun or a laptop, is very effective at inhibiting melatonin production.

This means that our bodies don’t get the proper signal that it’s time to go to sleep, reducing both the quantity and quality of our sleep.

Studies have linked melatonin suppression in the evening to various health problems, including metabolic syndrome, obesity and cancer, as well as mental disorders like depression.

Many have speculated that melatonin-disrupting blue light may be one of the key drivers behind obesity and many of the chronic diseases that are so common today.

However… indoor lighting and electronic devices are a major part of the modern lifestyle and they aren’t going away anytime soon.

Fortunately, there is a simple way to block blue light from entering your eyes and disrupting the natural sleep-wake cycle.

Bottom Line: Blue light in the evening tricks the brain into thinking that it is daytime, which inhibits the production of melatonin and reduces both the quantity and quality of sleep.

Using Blue-Blocking Glasses at Night is a Simple Way to Solve This Problem

Orange Glasses

The easiest and most effective way to avoid blue light in the evening, is to use amber-colored glasses.

These glasses effectively block all blue light, so your brain doesn’t get the signal that it is supposed to stay awake.

Studies show that when people use blue-blocking glasses, even in a lit room or using an electronic device, they produce just as much melatonin as if it were dark.

In one study, people’s melatonin levels in the evening were compared during three different lighting conditions.

  1. Dim light.
  2. Bright light.
  3. Bright light with blue-blocking glasses.

The graph below shows what happened to a typical subject’s melatonin levels…

Kayumov et al, 2005 - Light and Melatonin

As you can see, the bright light almost completely suppressed melatonin production, while the dim light did not.

But the people wearing the blue-blocking glasses produced the same amount of melatonin as those being exposed to the dim light. The glasses almost completely blocked the melatonin suppressing effect of the bright light.

Now to the fun part… not only have blue-blocking glasses been shown to increase melatonin, studies also suggest that they can cause major improvements in sleep and mental performance.

In one study, 20 individuals were randomized to use either blue blocking glasses, or glasses that didn’t block blue light, for 3 hours before bedtime. The study went on for two weeks.

The subjects using the blue-blocking glasses had major improvements in both sleep quality and mood.

These glasses have also been shown to greatly improve sleep in shift workers, when they put them on before bedtime.

There was also a study in elderly cataract patients, showing that blue-blocking lenses improved sleep and significantly reduced daytime dysfunction.

Overall, it seems pretty clear that using blue-blocking glasses in the evening is effective. Not only does it improve sleep, but it also improves mood and cognitive function.

Of course, this hasn’t been studied in a large, long-term study… but given the immense importance of sleep for health, it wouldn’t surprise me if these glasses could also help prevent chronic disease and lead to a longer life.

Bottom Line: Studies show that blue-blocking glasses increase melatonin production in the evening, leading to major improvements in sleep and mood.

Other Ways to Block Blue Light

Laptop With Orange Screen

If you don’t want to use these glasses every night, then there are a few other ways to reduce blue light exposure in the evening.

One popular way is to install a program called F.lux on your computer.

This program automatically adjusts the color and brightness of your screen based on your timezone. When it is dark outside, the program effectively blocks all blue light from your computer and gives the screen a faint orange color.

Although I’m not aware of any study on it, many people who use the computer a lot in the evening claim that this program helps them fall asleep.

There are a few other things you may want to consider:

  • Turn off all lights in your home 1-2 hours before bedtime.
  • Get a red or orange reading lamp, which doesn’t emit blue light. Candlelight works well too.
  • Keep your bedroom completely dark (highly recommended), or use a sleep mask.

It is also important to expose yourself to plenty of blue light during the day. If you can, go outside during the day and get some natural sunlight.

If that is not an option, consider using a blue light therapy device in the daytime. It is like a strong lamp that simulates the sun and bathes your face and eyes in blue light.

What to Expect

I have a long history of sleeping problems. It usually takes me at least an hour to fall asleep and I tend to wake up frequently throughout the night and feel poorly rested in the morning.

However… about a week ago, I purchased blue-blocking glasses from Amazon. I got the ones made by UVEX – they are cheap but get the job done.

I’ve set a reminder on my phone to always put them on at 8:30 pm. If I’m not home at that time, then I just put them on as soon as I get home in the evening.

After having them on for about 1-2 hours, I start feeling very relaxed and naturally tired.

Since I started using them, I’ve been falling asleep much faster and waking up refreshed in the morning. My mood has improved significantly and I’m finding it a lot easier to think and write.

I’ve personally tried a lot of different things in order to sleep better… but using blue-blocking glasses is by far the most effective sleep “hack” I have tried.

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This health news is shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs, a publisher of nutrition articles and supplier of effective natural remedies since 2002. Nutrition Breakthroughs makes the original calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II.

Article Source: https://authoritynutrition.com/block-blue-light-to-sleep-better/