The 5 Best Natural Sleep Remedies

via http://www.Lifed.com/the-5-best-natural-sleep-remedies
sleeping woman
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Shared by Nutrition Breakthroughs,
maker of the effective calcium and magnesium based sleep aid Sleep Minerals II
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Story at a Glance:

There are few things that feel worse than being exhausted, yet unable to sleep. In addition to insomnia (the inability to fall or stay asleep), many people also suffer from poor sleep quality, which can cause you to feel sleepy during the day despite getting eight or more hours of rest.

If you frequently have trouble getting a decent night’s sleep, it’s a good idea to see your doctor to rule out/treat any underlying conditions, such as sleep apnea or depression. For many people, sleep problems can be remedied naturally with lifestyle changes and proper nutrition. The following are five natural, safe and effective remedies that might help you get some good shut-eye.

1. Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral that our bodies need for a multitude of biological roles, ranging from bone health to mental health. Human and animal studies also indicate that magnesium plays an important role in sleep, and that magnesium therapy can help insomnia sufferers. Although magnesium is available in a multitude of foods, the USDA says that 57 percent of Americans do not meet the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for magnesium. So how can you get more of this essential sleep nutrient? One method is to eat more foods with magnesium – fibrous foods, such as whole grains, nuts and vegetables are generally high in this mineral. Magnesium supplements in daily doses of less than 350 mg are also considered safe for most adults. Magnesium supplements can also help relieve constipation – another common consequence of a typical fiber-deficient American diet.

2. Sunlight

Although it may seem counterintuitive that bright light can actually help you sleep, getting enough natural light during the day is important for maintaining circadian rhythms that control our sleep-wake cycles. While many of us don’t get sufficient sunlight because we work indoors all day and/or live in a place that doesn’t get a lot of sunlight for much of the year, people who work night-shifts can be especially light-deprived. There is also a growing body of evidence suggesting that vitamin D, a nutrient we get from certain foods and from exposure to ultraviolet light, has wide-ranging health implications, and that a lack of it may cause insomnia and other serious health problems. To get enough sunlight and vitamin D for good health and good sleep, experts recommend getting 10 to 20 minutes of direct sunlight exposure each day – ideally, in the morning hours. Light therapy boxes and vitamin D supplements (in typical therapeutic doses) are also considered safe and effective.

3. Yoga

Another major culprit for poor sleep is a lack of physical activity. America’s population is largely sedentary, spending most of the day sitting in a chair at work, sitting in the car while commuting, and sitting in front of the TV when we get home. Unless we find a way to incorporate some exercise into our daily routine, your body may not be tired enough to sleep well at night – even though your mind is exhausted. Exercise is also important for relieving stress and tension that accompany our modern, hectic lifestyles. Although you should aim to get at least 20 to 30 minutes of exercise every day for good sleep and for good health in general, exercising vigorously within several hours of bedtime can actually interfere with your sleep. For this reason, gentle yoga, with its series of tension-relieving stretches and meditative elements, is an excellent type of exercise that you can practice in the evening to help you sleep – you can even do certain poses in bed! A 2010 University of Rochester study found that cancer survivors with insomnia who practiced gentle yoga for four weeks reported improved sleep quality and decreased use of sleep aids during the program’s duration.

4. Good sleep hygiene

Although it sounds like it might have to do with the cleanliness of your sheets, the term “sleep hygiene” is actually used to refer to your overall sleep environment and habits that can affect your sleep quality. Many of the factors that impact our sleep quality are environmental or have to do with our nighttime behaviors. The following elements are considered by sleep experts to be important components of good sleep hygiene:

* Going to sleep at the same time every night, and waking up at the same time each morning.
* Limiting or avoiding consumption of caffeine, nicotine and alcohol – all of which can impair sleep quality or make it hard to fall asleep.
* Avoiding late-night exposure to bright electronic screens, e.g., iPads, smartphones, TVs, computers, etc., which can disrupt circadian rhythms.
* Relaxing before bed with a warm bath or another restful activity. Lavender aromatherapy may also help relax you before bed to combat insomnia.
* Using the bedroom only for sleep and sex – not for watching TV or working from your laptop, for example.
* Making sure your sleeping environment is sufficiently cool, dark and quiet.

5. B-vitamins

Like magnesium and vitamin D, B-vitamins are also important nutrients for sleep. In particular, B-6 is important for the production of serotonin, a “feel good” hormone which aids sleep and combats anxiety and restlessness that can keep you awake; and folic acid (B-9) deficiency has been found in those with insomnia and in those with depression, a condition which is often implicated in insomnia. Vitamin B-12 is also needed for good sleep and mental health, and certain populations, including seniors and vegans, are more likely to be deficient in this vitamin. Additionally, niacin, or B-3, has been shown to increase REM sleep and help with depression. Good food sources of B vitamins include animal products such as fish and dairy, and whole, unprocessed foods such as whole grains, beans, and green, leafy vegetables. Taken at recommended doses, B vitamin supplements are also generally considered to be quite safe, as they are water-soluble, meaning that any excess vitamins will be excreted through the urine.
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This information was written by Lifed.com and is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep, relaxation, heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength and menopause insomnia.

The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc, and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Doctor P. P. of Houston, Texas says: “I had developed sleeping problems and took two different sleep medications over the course of several weeks.  When I discontinued them, the insomnia came back even worse. I literally got about 20 hours of sleep in 6 weeks time. Sleep Minerals II was an answer to my prayers. I’ve been taking it for a couple weeks and getting many hours of sleep a night. As a doctor I would definitely avoid prescribing sleeping drugs — I would recommend Sleep Minerals II.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II click this link.

Study Confirms Link Between Insomnia and Hot Flashes

insomnia hot flash remedyA team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California recently conducted a study to help determine the causes of insomnia among premenopausal and postmenopausal women.  The team conducted phone interviews with 982 women and gathered information about their sleep history, hot flashes and overall health.

They found that 51% of  postmenopausal women experienced hot flashes and 79% of premenopausal women had them.  Among the women with the most severe hot flashes (based on their intensity and frequency), 81% of them experienced sleeplessness and insomnia.

The lead researcher said: “In this paper, we have observed without any doubt and in a significant way that hot flashes are associated with insomnia. This is the first observational study showing the link between insomnia and hot flashes while controlling for other factors that could account for insomnia in women.”

Comment from the Blog Author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis discusses the many roles of calcium in women’s health in her book “Let’s Get Well” and says: “During the menopause, the lack of the ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone) causes severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur.  At these times, high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

One natural insomnia remedy gaining popularity with women and people of all ages is Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale California.  Sleep Minerals II contains powerful forms of the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules,  and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. in Santa Clarita, CA says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia, it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired. I also had crawling and tingling feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and after a week of taking it, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Insomnia Tip: Study Shows Cooler Body Temperature Helps Sleep

A drop in body temperature may help you fall asleep.  According to a study in the Journal “Sleep”, making a special effort to cool down before bedtime may be of particular benefit to insomniacs. Sleep specialists have long debated whether the regular nighttime drop in temperature induces sleep or follows it. To investigate this question, Doctors Murphy and Campbell of the New York Hospital’s Cornell Medical Center in White Plains, recruited 21 men and 23 women, aged 19 to 82.

The researchers identified the time at which the subjects’ body temperature fell most sharply. This point almost always occurred in the two hours before sleep began.  Therefore, people with trouble falling asleep might benefit from taking hot baths about 90 minutes before bedtime, the researchers speculate. When they get out of the bath, body temperature will drop rapidly, and this might help them to fall asleep faster.

A note from the blog author: Another tip would be to keep your bedroom comfortably cool to assist with a longer, deeper sleep.  This health tip is provided by http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II. Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for sleep and relaxation: Calcium and magnesium, along with Vitamin D and zinc. The ingredients are delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making them more easily assimilated than capsules or tablets and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

Wendy R. of Honolulu, Hawaii says: “My friends know that I’ve had chronic insomnia for a very long time. Surprisingly, I received the Sleep Minerals II and took it and I actually slept! This thing really works. In the past, if I ever got a good nights sleep I’d say “I slept like a baby”, but that’s the wrong analogy. Those little guys get up every two hours. I am actually beginning to sleep like an adult — a much-rested adult.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit https://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Causes and Remedies for Hot Flashes and Night Sweats

A night sweat is a “hot flash” that occurs in the night, often while one is sleeping.  A hot flash, also called a hot flush, is a sudden unexpected feeling of warmth and often a breakout of sweating in the upper half of the body. These flashes are experienced by 80% of women around the time of menopause, and men can also have them due to a lessening of testosterone.

At night time while a woman sleeps, her body temperature rises steeply just prior to a hot flash, causing her to wake up.  The National Sleep Foundation writes that as many as 61% of post-menopausal women report having symptoms of insomnia and less satisfying sleep, due in part due to hot flashes interrupting their sleep with frequent awakenings.

Dr. John R. Lee, M.D. explains the source of hot flashes in his book: “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Menopause”.  There is an area of the brain that controls the amounts of estrogen and progesterone made by the ovaries.  When these two hormones become depleted as in menopause, the brain sends out signals for the ovaries to make more hormones, but they no longer respond to these prompts.

The signaling system can go awry as the brain sends out more and more signals and actually begins to “shout”.  This over-activity begins to affect adjacent areas of the brain; particularly the area that controls body temperature and sweating mechanisms — thus the occurrence of hot flashes.

Sometimes spicy food, hot beverages, caffeine, alcohol or cigarettes can bring on a hot flash. For help with night sweats in bed, keep the bedroom cool and keep a washcloth in a bowl of ice near the bed to use on the forehead or chest as needed. To minimize hot flashes during the summer weather, stay cool by using fans and drinking cold drinks.  Keep air conditioners on and make sure that air is circulating throughout the room.  Dress in layers so you can peel them off as needed.

Vitamins E and C have been shown in studies to help reduce hot flashes.  One study supporting vitamin E was published in “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” and concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Extensive research indicates that vitamin C strengthens blood vessels and acts as a potent health enhancement.  In a study that combined vitamin C with bioflavonoids (the white matter on the inside of orange peels), 67% of the subjects reported complete relief from hot flashes.

The minerals calcium and magnesium can also help with deeper, sounder sleep, particularly because estrogen in women and testosterone in men helps to keep these minerals in circulation in the body and when these hormones are depleted, more frequent mineral supplementation is needed.

Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com is an example of a natural insomnia remedy that provides good results for menopause symptoms.  It contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie from Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and took them and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click here: http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Six Tips to Stay Asleep During the Night

Some people as they approach middle age may find it more difficult to stay asleep during the night.  They can fall asleep okay and the first part of their night is fine, but around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m., they find themselves habitually awake and unable to get back to sleep.  Here are some sleep tips that may help:

  1. Use a black eye mask to cover your eyes and use earplugs to keep the noise out.  A dark, cool room is most ideal to help the body produce melatonin, the hormone produced by the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycles.
  2. Get some sunlight by taking a walk during the day.  Being out in the sun will also set your wake-sleep cycle in a good way.  Additionally, the exercise and body movement helps with better, more restful sleep at night.
  3. If headaches or tension are keeping you up, try using some magnesium.  One German study found that 42 percent of the people taking magnesium reduced the duration and intensity of their migraine headaches.
  4. For females that experience hot flashes and night sweats during the night, take some extra steps to keep yourself and your bedroom cooler at night.  Wear lighter bedclothes, use less blankets, and you can also use a slightly damp washcloth on your forehead or neck.
  5. Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep, therefore highly absorbable calcium and magnesium supplements are effective.  The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis advises that during pre-menopause or menopause, the lack of estrogen and progesterone can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur such as irritability, leg cramps, insomnia, hot flashes and night sweats.
  6. It can work well for some people to take a calcium and magnesium supplement before bed and then again at the time of night they habitually wake up and are unable to go back to sleep.  This last tip just may be the clincher that finally puts one’s insomnia issue to rest.

This health information is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.  To learn more click here.

Sleep Drugs – FDA Warns of Side Effects While Natural Minerals Offer an Alternative Remedy

The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) recently updated their web page that describes the many potential side effects of sleeping drugs.  On their site, they state that “Complex behaviors are a potential side effect of sedative-hypnotic products – a class of drugs used to help a person fall asleep and stay asleep.  These include making phone calls, sleep-eating, and getting into the car and driving while not fully awake. Most people do not remember these events later.”

Russell Katz, M.D., Director of the FDA’s Division of Neurology Products says, “Complex behaviors, such as sleep-driving, could be potentially dangerous to both the patients and to others.”

Other rare but potential side effects of sedative-hypnotic drugs are a severe allergic reaction and severe facial swelling, both of which can occur as early as the first time the product is taken.  Katz says, “Severe allergic reactions can affect a patient’s ability to breathe and can affect other body systems as well, and can even be fatal at times.”

To make the serious risks of these products better known, the FDA requested earlier that all manufacturers of sedative-hypnotic drug products strengthen their product labeling to include warnings about complex sleep-related behaviors.  The revised labeling affects the following drug products:

* Ambien, Ambien CR (zolpidem tartrate)
* Butisol sodium
* Carbrital (pentobarbital and carbromal)
* Dalmane (flurazepam hydrochloride)
* Doral (quazepam)
* Halcion (triazolam)
* Lunesta (eszopiclone)
* Placidyl (ethchlorvynol)
* Prosom (estazolam)
* Restoril (temazepam)
* Rozerem (ramelteon)
* Seconal (secobarbital sodium)
* Sonata (zaleplon)

From a nutritional perspective, several research studies have shown certain minerals to be effective alternatives to help people fall asleep and stay asleep through the night.  James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.”

The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis discusses minerals as an insomnia remedy in her book Let’s Get Well.  She says: “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the billions of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency. Restoration to the normal course of sleep was achieved following the normalization of the blood calcium level.

In magnesium deficiency, chronic insomnia is one of the main, central symptoms. Sleep is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings. On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was proven in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota. The study was titled “Effects of trace element nutrition on sleep patterns in adult women.” It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of calcium and magnesium is beneficial to overall health, and that these two minerals should be taken together in a 2 to 1 ratio for best results.

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural ingredients for relaxation and deeper sleep. The result was Sleep Minerals II.  This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, as well as heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc, and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says:  “Due to some very stressful issues in my life, I hadn’t slept much in two and a half months before being prescribed sleeping drugs.  I had become dependent on them and couldn’t sleep without them. I did my research on the Internet and came across Sleep Minerals II. I take two before bed and now I can sleep through the whole night without drugs. If I do have to get up, I can fall right back asleep. Another benefit is it also helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

Sleeping drugs can wreak havoc on one’s health and well-being and cause life-threatening side effects.  The right blend of natural minerals can be an effective natural insomnia remedy that helps the sleepless get some good rest.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.