Enzymes: The Secret to Vibrant Health and Energy

This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II
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Greetings to you,

Health-conscious people have often asked: “What are enzymes and what can they do for my health and energy?”  And also, “What effects do an enzyme deficiency have on my body?”

The magic of enzymes is that they are a delicate lifelike substance found in all living animal and plant cells.  They are energized protein molecules that are essential for digesting food, repairing tissue, and creating virtually all of the chemical reactions in the body. 

Life cannot be sustained without them, and because our bodies produce only so many enzymes during our lifetime, there are less and less of them available as we age (1). This may lead to poor digestion and blocked absorption of the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients we need for good health.

Digestive enzymes are made in the pancreas and released into the intestine to break down food and turn it into energy.  Raw food enzymes are obtained from eating raw foods such as fruits and vegetables. Foods high in natural enzymes are avocados, bananas, mangos and sprouts. 

Cooked and processed foods are depleted of all of their enzymes.  Another type of enzyme is a metabolic or systemic enzyme. These are also made by the pancreas and other glands, but they travel directly through the bloodstream and initiate chemical reactions inside the cells that orchestrate life’s processes in every organ, gland, tissue and cell. 

It is a key part of our nutrition to eat raw foods and to take enzyme supplements when eating cooked or processed foods, in order to not rob the body of the metabolic enzymes it must have to keep the body running. When there aren’t enough digestive enzymes, the body forces its metabolic enzymes into use to digest our food. 

This takes them away from their vital duties of repair, maintenance and infection fighting, all of which need constant attention.  Enzymes from raw food or supplements act to reduce the burden on the body’s natural healing powers, allowing it to perform its natural self-curing function.

Enzymes can either be taken with food or on an empty stomach.  When enzyme supplements are taken on an empty stomach, 45 minutes to one hour before meals, they stimulate the immune system to engulf and remove waste material such as bacteria, cysts, and tumors (2), and they can treat a variety of conditions. 

Many studies have confirmed the successful use of proteolytic (protein digesting) systemic enzymes for treating a wide variety of conditions.  They have benefited arthritis and eased the pain of sports injuries.  They are used to control inflammation and swelling, to bring about faster recovery after surgery, and to maintain good heart health by breaking down fats and cholesterol (3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11).

Proteolytic systemic enzymes include bromelain, papain and pancreatin.  Taken between meals, they can fortify the blood and be stored for later use when needed.

Without enough enzymes, our digestive tract deposits a large quantity of toxic material from undigested food into our blood, which is carried throughout our body.  It accumulates over time and contributes to many chronic health problems and conditions. The body has to use up a lot of its energy in order to digest enzyme-deficient foods.  By using supplemental enzymes, you can divert this energy right back to yourself!
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This health news is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural sleep aid Sleep Minerals II
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REFERENCES:

1.Enzymes: The Foundation of Life. Neville Press, Inc.1994.

2.Oral Enzymes – New Approach to Cancer Treatment. Munich, Germany: Forum-Medizin, 1996 

3. Pliml W, et al. Effects of ribose on exercise-induced ischaemia in stable coronary artery disease. Lancet 1992;340:507-10.

4. Zuschlag JM. Double-blind clinical study using certain proteolytic enzyme mixtures in karate fighters. Working paper. Mucos Pharma GmbH (Germany). 1988;1-5. Rathgeber WF. The use of proteolytic enzymes (Chymoral) in sporting injuries. S Afr Med J. 1971;45:181-183.

5. Shaw PC. The use of a trypsin-chymotrypsin formulation in fractures of the hand. Br J Clin Pract. 1969;23:25-26.

6. Rahn HD. Efficacy of hydorlytic enzymes in surgery. Paper presented at: 24th FIMS World Congress of Sports Medicine; May 27-June 1, 1990; Amsterdam.

7. Vinzenz K. Treatment of edema with hydrolytic enzymes in oral surgical procedures [translated from German]. Quintessenz. 1991;42:1053-1064.

8. Seltzer AP. Minimizing post-operative edema and ecchymoses by the use of an oral enzyme preparation (bromelain): a controlled study of 53 rhinoplasty cases. Eye Ear Nose Throat Mon. 1962;41:813-817.

9. Blonstein JL. Control of swelling in boxing injuries. Practitioner. 1969;203:206. 26. Zatuchni GI, Colombi DJ. Bromelains therapy for the prevention of episiotomy pain. Obstet Gynecol. 1967;29:275-278.

10. Tassman GC, Zafran JN, Zayon GM. Evaluation of a plant proteolytic enzyme for the control of imflammation and pain. J Dent Med. 1964;19:73-77.

11. Gylling U, Rintala A, Taipale S, et al. The effect of a proteolytic enzyme combinate (bromelain) on the postoperative oedema by oral application. A clinical and experimental study. Acta Chir Scand. 1966;131:193-196.

Research Shows Vitamin C and Minerals Cool Off Hot Flashes

vitamin c hot flashesSurprise: One natural remedy proven in a research study to relieve hot flashes may be unexpected to some, as it is such a well-known, widely used vitamin with many benefits.  It’s the famous vitamin C.

The study was called “Non-Hormonal Control of Vaso-Motor Flushing in Menopausal Patients”, published in the journal: “Chicago Medicine.”  Vasomotor refers to the nerves and muscles causing blood vessels to constrict (narrow) or dilate (open). Blood vessels dilate during hot flashes — this process is the body’s way to release the heat. Extensive research indicates that vitamin C strengthens blood vessel membranes, eases hot flashes and helps slow the overall aging process.

In the vitamin C study, A total of 94 patients were studied, all of who had reached menopause.  They were given 200 milligrams of vitamin C and 200 milligrams of bioflavonoids (the substance contained on the inside of orange peels) six times daily.  Therefore each subject received 1200 mg of both the bioflavonoids and vitamin C each day.  The results were that  67% of the subjects reported complete relief from hot flashes and 21% reported partial relief, giving this combination an overall 88% success rate.

Vitamin C is also proven to be a “Beauty Vitamin.”  In support of vitamin C as an anti wrinkle nutrient, a study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition announced the results of researchers from the United Kingdom. They discovered that higher vitamin C intakes were associated with a lower likelihood of a wrinkled skin appearance and skin dryness. Vitamin C majorly improved overall skin appearance in a study of 4,025 women aged 40 to 74.

Mineral deficiency can also be a factor in contributing to menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats.  The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis writes of this in her book “Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit”.

Davis says, “The amount of calcium in a woman’s blood parallels the activity of the ovaries. During the menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur, including irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, and insomnia. These problems can be easily overcome if the intakes of calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D are all generously increased and are well absorbed.”

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own menopausal battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural insomnia remedies for relaxation and deeper sleep.

The result was Sleep Minerals II, a natural insomnia remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D and zinc. The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable. After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep. I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

The minerals in Sleep Minerals II are also proven to be beneficial for strong bones, healthy muscles, menopause symptoms, teenage insomnia, and correction of calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D deficiencies.

Vitamin C can be found in many delicious foods and is known to be beneficial for immunity, stomach health, maintaining blood vessels, strengthening bones and teeth, healing wounds, and supporting heart and eye health.  Vitamin C is a key player in the production of collagen, which is the most abundant protein in the body and is a component of muscle, joints, bone, skin, hair and nails.  High amounts of vitamin C is supplied by citrus fruits, many berries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, red and green peppers, and in supplements.

For good health, smooth skin, hot flash relief, and a refreshing night of beauty sleep each night, keep your vitamin C levels high and take some absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium. For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit the natural sleep aid page.

Menopause and Insomnia – The Calcium and Magnesium Link

Women in the pre-menopause and menopause years are more and more finding themselves experiencing symptoms of chronic insomnia, hot flashes, night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety, fatigue and depression. Uzzi Reiss, M.D., author of Natural Hormone Balance for Women, says: “Some of the above reactions occur nearly simultaneously whenever the level of estrogen falls.”

Hormone drugs, nutritional remedies, and lifestyle changes are some of the options available to women. Consumer Affairs.com reports that while 70 percent of women entering menopause will have some symptoms, most symptoms can be managed with healthy lifestyle improvements. In their recent report, they do not recommend hormone drugs for women who have an elevated risk of heart disease, stroke or cancer – which is 35 to 50 percent of all women 50 and older.

As menopause approaches, another emerging link between estrogen decline and its symptoms is the aspect of mineral deficiency. Mildred Seeling, M.D. describes this in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. She says “Estrogen enhances magnesium utilization and uptake by soft tissues and bone, and may explain the resistance of young women to heart disease and osteoporosis — as well as the increased prevalence of these diseases when estrogen production ceases.”

Magnesium works best when it’s balanced with calcium. The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis writes of mineral deficiency during menopause in her book “Let’s Get Well.” Davis says: “Calcium is less well absorbed and the urinary losses are greater when the output of estrogen decreases. Such calcium-deficiency symptoms as nervousness, irritability, insomnia, and headaches are common.”

Chronic insomnia is one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Sleep in magnesium deficiency is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was shown in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

Regarding the use of a sleep remedy for the relief of insomnia and other menopause symptoms, certain formulas may be more effective than others. The combination of minerals included and the presence of vitamin cofactors (such as vitamin D and K) in the product are key. Formulas should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium. The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form is more digestible than tablets.  Softgels formulated with carrier oils such as evening primrose have been shown to increase mineral absorption, reduce calcium excretion, and increase bone density.

Natural insomnia remedies for sleep, such as Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com are gaining popularity with menopausal women. Sleep Minerals II contains calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and zinc  – all combined in a softgel with carrier oils.  Adelle Davis says: “During the menopause… high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

Lyn K. of Los Angeles, CA. says “I’ve had chronic insomnia for some years now and had been taking other calcium-based insomnia remedies to help with my sleep. None have worked as effectively or continually as Sleep Minerals II. I can count on it whenever I need help falling asleep at night or going back to sleep in the middle of the night.  It also eases my menopause symptoms, evens out my hormonal changes, and seems to put my body into a healthy balance.”

Corrine E. of Alberta Canada says: “I have used many types of sleeping pills during the last 20 to 25 years to try to help cope with my chronic insomnia and Sleep Minerals II has helped me more than all of them.  This sleep remedy has made a big difference for me. I am on my third bottle. I ran out of them at one point and realized just how much they were helping my sleep.“

Consumer Reports advises that hormone drugs can increase the risk of heart disease, breast cancer, blood clots and stroke. An increasing number of women are turning to non-pharmaceutical remedies for insomnia. Highly absorbable forms of natural minerals can be a soothing alternative.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html