Causes and Remedies for Hot Flashes and Night Sweats

A night sweat is a “hot flash” that occurs in the night, often while one is sleeping.  A hot flash, also called a hot flush, is a sudden unexpected feeling of warmth and often a breakout of sweating in the upper half of the body. These flashes are experienced by 80% of women around the time of menopause, and men can also have them due to a lessening of testosterone.

At night time while a woman sleeps, her body temperature rises steeply just prior to a hot flash, causing her to wake up.  The National Sleep Foundation writes that as many as 61% of post-menopausal women report having symptoms of insomnia and less satisfying sleep, due in part due to hot flashes interrupting their sleep with frequent awakenings.

Dr. John R. Lee, M.D. explains the source of hot flashes in his book: “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Menopause”.  There is an area of the brain that controls the amounts of estrogen and progesterone made by the ovaries.  When these two hormones become depleted as in menopause, the brain sends out signals for the ovaries to make more hormones, but they no longer respond to these prompts.

The signaling system can go awry as the brain sends out more and more signals and actually begins to “shout”.  This over-activity begins to affect adjacent areas of the brain; particularly the area that controls body temperature and sweating mechanisms — thus the occurrence of hot flashes.

Sometimes spicy food, hot beverages, caffeine, alcohol or cigarettes can bring on a hot flash. For help with night sweats in bed, keep the bedroom cool and keep a washcloth in a bowl of ice near the bed to use on the forehead or chest as needed. To minimize hot flashes during the summer weather, stay cool by using fans and drinking cold drinks.  Keep air conditioners on and make sure that air is circulating throughout the room.  Dress in layers so you can peel them off as needed.

Vitamins E and C have been shown in studies to help reduce hot flashes.  One study supporting vitamin E was published in “Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation” and concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Extensive research indicates that vitamin C strengthens blood vessels and acts as a potent health enhancement.  In a study that combined vitamin C with bioflavonoids (the white matter on the inside of orange peels), 67% of the subjects reported complete relief from hot flashes.

The minerals calcium and magnesium can also help with deeper, sounder sleep, particularly because estrogen in women and testosterone in men helps to keep these minerals in circulation in the body and when these hormones are depleted, more frequent mineral supplementation is needed.

Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com is an example of a natural insomnia remedy that provides good results for menopause symptoms.  It contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome and bone strength.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie from Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia that it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and took them and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, click here: http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Six Tips to Stay Asleep During the Night

Some people as they approach middle age may find it more difficult to stay asleep during the night.  They can fall asleep okay and the first part of their night is fine, but around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m., they find themselves habitually awake and unable to get back to sleep.  Here are some sleep tips that may help:

  1. Use a black eye mask to cover your eyes and use earplugs to keep the noise out.  A dark, cool room is most ideal to help the body produce melatonin, the hormone produced by the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycles.
  2. Get some sunlight by taking a walk during the day.  Being out in the sun will also set your wake-sleep cycle in a good way.  Additionally, the exercise and body movement helps with better, more restful sleep at night.
  3. If headaches or tension are keeping you up, try using some magnesium.  One German study found that 42 percent of the people taking magnesium reduced the duration and intensity of their migraine headaches.
  4. For females that experience hot flashes and night sweats during the night, take some extra steps to keep yourself and your bedroom cooler at night.  Wear lighter bedclothes, use less blankets, and you can also use a slightly damp washcloth on your forehead or neck.
  5. Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep, therefore highly absorbable calcium and magnesium supplements are effective.  The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis advises that during pre-menopause or menopause, the lack of estrogen and progesterone can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur such as irritability, leg cramps, insomnia, hot flashes and night sweats.
  6. It can work well for some people to take a calcium and magnesium supplement before bed and then again at the time of night they habitually wake up and are unable to go back to sleep.  This last tip just may be the clincher that finally puts one’s insomnia issue to rest.

This health information is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.  To learn more click here.

Study Shows Cell Phones in the Bedroom Leads to Poor Sleep

A recent poll from the National Sleep Foundation found a correlation between the use of technology use in the bedroom and poor sleep.  The findings showed that about 39% of Americans are using cell phones in their bedrooms in the hour before trying to go to sleep.  72% of these are teenagers between 13 and 18 years old.  Those who texted in the hour before going to sleep said they were less likely to get a good night’s sleep, were more likely to drive drowsy, and were more likely to wake up feeling un-refreshed.

While cell phones and computers can increase productivity, it may be more conducive of good sleep to turn them off in the hour before bed and do some relaxing reading, take a bath, or other calming activity to unwind.

This health information is brought to you by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.

Study of Restless Legs Syndrome in Canada Finds it Runs in Families

By Jobee Knight

A study was recently published in the Archives of Neurology on Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).  RLS is a disruptive condition that affects the nervous system and up to 10% of the U.S. population have some form of it.  It results in an irresistible urge to move the legs, often accompanied by unpleasant sensations in the legs such as creeping, crawling, tingling, pulling or pain.  Because RLS most often occurs in the evening, it can disrupt sleep, contribute to insomnia, and reduce a person’s quality of life.

In the Montreal Canada study, RLS patients were followed up in a specialized sleep center for 15 years.  479 affected family members were assessed by their responses to a structured questionnaire.

The Results — the researchers data showed that RLS occurs in families, with 77% of those having the condition being in a family with other members who have it.  Siblings of a person who is severely afflicted with the condition are about 3.6 times more likely to have the disease than those without an affected sibling, and offspring of parents with the condition have 1.8 times the risk.

The researchers also write that RLS has an average duration of 24 years and is more prominent among women who also have an increased incidence of anemia or iron deficiency, arthritis, or a number of pregnancies.

Comment from the Blog Author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

One natural insomnia remedy showing good results with restless leg syndrome and insomnia is Sleep Minerals II, made by Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA.  This natural sleep remedy contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, restless legs syndrome, heart health, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc, and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I just wanted to take the time to write and say that I have been taking your supplement “Sleep Minerals II” for about a month now. I can’t thank you enough. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing! I have suffered with insomnia and restless legs for 2 1/2 years now. I have not had one bad night since I started taking this. I have had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…..it’s gone for a month now. This has been a miracle for me!”

Visit this link to learn more about Sleep Minerals II.

Sleep Drugs – FDA Warns of Side Effects While Natural Minerals Offer an Alternative Remedy

The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) recently updated their web page that describes the many potential side effects of sleeping drugs.  On their site, they state that “Complex behaviors are a potential side effect of sedative-hypnotic products – a class of drugs used to help a person fall asleep and stay asleep.  These include making phone calls, sleep-eating, and getting into the car and driving while not fully awake. Most people do not remember these events later.”

Russell Katz, M.D., Director of the FDA’s Division of Neurology Products says, “Complex behaviors, such as sleep-driving, could be potentially dangerous to both the patients and to others.”

Other rare but potential side effects of sedative-hypnotic drugs are a severe allergic reaction and severe facial swelling, both of which can occur as early as the first time the product is taken.  Katz says, “Severe allergic reactions can affect a patient’s ability to breathe and can affect other body systems as well, and can even be fatal at times.”

To make the serious risks of these products better known, the FDA requested earlier that all manufacturers of sedative-hypnotic drug products strengthen their product labeling to include warnings about complex sleep-related behaviors.  The revised labeling affects the following drug products:

* Ambien, Ambien CR (zolpidem tartrate)
* Butisol sodium
* Carbrital (pentobarbital and carbromal)
* Dalmane (flurazepam hydrochloride)
* Doral (quazepam)
* Halcion (triazolam)
* Lunesta (eszopiclone)
* Placidyl (ethchlorvynol)
* Prosom (estazolam)
* Restoril (temazepam)
* Rozerem (ramelteon)
* Seconal (secobarbital sodium)
* Sonata (zaleplon)

From a nutritional perspective, several research studies have shown certain minerals to be effective alternatives to help people fall asleep and stay asleep through the night.  James F. Balch, M.D., author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, writes: “A lack of the nutrients calcium and magnesium will cause you to wake up after a few hours and not be able to return to sleep.”

The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis discusses minerals as an insomnia remedy in her book Let’s Get Well.  She says: “A calcium deficiency often shows itself by insomnia, another form of an inability to relax. The harm done by sleeping tablets, to say nothing of the billions of dollars spent on them, could largely be avoided if the calcium intake were adequate.”

Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency. Restoration to the normal course of sleep was achieved following the normalization of the blood calcium level.

In magnesium deficiency, chronic insomnia is one of the main, central symptoms. Sleep is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings. On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was proven in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota. The study was titled “Effects of trace element nutrition on sleep patterns in adult women.” It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of calcium and magnesium is beneficial to overall health, and that these two minerals should be taken together in a 2 to 1 ratio for best results.

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and founder of Nutrition Breakthroughs in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural ingredients for relaxation and deeper sleep. The result was Sleep Minerals II.  This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, as well as heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc, and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.R.C. of Massachusetts says:  “Due to some very stressful issues in my life, I hadn’t slept much in two and a half months before being prescribed sleeping drugs.  I had become dependent on them and couldn’t sleep without them. I did my research on the Internet and came across Sleep Minerals II. I take two before bed and now I can sleep through the whole night without drugs. If I do have to get up, I can fall right back asleep. Another benefit is it also helps alleviate my chronic fatigue and aches and pains.”

Sleeping drugs can wreak havoc on one’s health and well-being and cause life-threatening side effects.  The right blend of natural minerals can be an effective natural insomnia remedy that helps the sleepless get some good rest.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit this page.

12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome

This helpful information on restless leg syndrome comes from the Editors of Consumer Guide:

It’s bad enough when you can’t get to sleep and you just lie there, staring at the ceiling. But people who suffer from restless legs syndrome don’t just lie there. They are seized by an uncontrollable urge to move their legs. Their legs actually twitch or jerk, while they experience the sensation of something squirming or wiggling under their skin. Consequently, restless legs syndrome can lead to problems associated with sleep deprivation, such as anxiety and depression.

Researchers say this is a condition still shrouded in much mystery.  Although there seem to be connections with other conditions — such as heart, lung, and kidney disorders: circulatory problems; and arthritis — the culprit sometimes appears to be as simple as excessive caffeine consumption or too little exercise.

The following home remedies are designed to help you combat this problem. If you find that you still have twitching legs after you’ve tried these tips, however, it’s time to get a medical evaluation.

1. Get up and walk. Walking around may be the only thing that helps. A midnight stroll through the house may calm your legs enough to keep them still when you go back to bed.

2. Check out your caffeine consumption. Coffee, tea, chocolate, sodas, and even over-the-counter (OTC) medications may contain caffeine. Try cutting your consumption of caffeine-containing foods and medications (or substituting decaffeinated varieties) to see if your condition improves. Avoid tobacco, which contains the stimulant nicotine, and alcohol, which can have its own detrimental effects on sleep, as well.

3. Modify your medication. Some OTC medications, such as certain cold medications and allergy pills, contain mild stimulants that can result in jittery legs. Ask your pharmacist if any medications you are taking contain stimulants and whether there are any nonstimulating alternatives.

4. Take a bath. A warm bath or massage before bed relaxes muscles and therefore may be helpful.

5. Change your temperature. Sometimes, a change from hot to cold, or cold to hot, can do the trick. Try putting a heating pad or hot pack on your legs for a short while. If that doesn’t work, drape a cool towel over your legs, or dip your feet in cool water.

6. Make sure you’re eating well. There are some indications that a deficiency in iron, folate, or magnesium may contribute to restless legs syndrome. By eating a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods, you should get the vitamins and minerals you need. However, your doctor may recommend supplements of these specific nutrients.

7. Make a bedtime habit. Get into a regular routine that will help your mind and body settle down and prepare for bed.

8. Stick to a schedule. Getting to bed at about the same time each night and allowing for a full night’s sleep may help avoid the fatigue that could be a contributing factor to restless legs syndrome.

9. Soothe your stress. Stress may not be the cause of restless legs syndrome, but it can exacerbate it. Try to eliminate some of the stress in your life. Regular exercise and some form of relaxation technique or even an engaging in a hobby may help you “de-stress.”

10. Exercise your legs. Moderate exercise often helps, although excessive exercise can aggravate restless leg symptoms. A daily walk at a moderate pace is an excellent exercise, especially for folks who haven’t been very physically active in a while

11. Stretch your legs.  Try stretching your calves, hamstrings (backs of the knees), and gluteal (butt) muscles before bed.

12. Wear socks to bed. Some experts have found that a lot of people who suffer from restless legs syndrome also seem to have cold feet. Although nobody has studied the connection, it might not hurt to bundle up your tootsies for the night.

……Additional comments from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs:
Studies have shown the mineral magnesium to be effective in helping to calm restless leg syndrome and insomnia.  Supplements should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form containing healthy carrier oils mixed with the minerals is more digestible than tablets or capsules, and provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

One formula that has these qualities and is gaining in popularity with restless leg syndrome sufferers is Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com.  Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of the best minerals for relaxation — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin d, zinc, and heart-healthy rice bran oil in a softgel.

Valerie H. of Los Angeles, CA. says: “I had very severe menopause insomnia and it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired. I also had crawling and tingling feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and after a few days of taking it, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

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Credit:  the Editors of Consumer Guide.  “12 Home Remedies for Restless Legs Syndrome”  16 January 2007.  HowStuffWorks.com. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/home-remedies/home-remedies-for-restless-legs-syndrome.htm  5 September 2012.
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Women Do Not Get Enough Vitamin D During Menopause

via http://www.sciencedaily.com

ScienceDaily – A healthy diet is especially important during the menopause — a period in which the risk of suffering from health problems increases. For the current study, various programs have analyzed the diet of peri- and postmenopausal women in Spain, alongside the troubles that come with this transition. The results show that all of those groups studied have a deficient intake of vitamin D.

Marina Pollán, researcher at the Carlos III Institute of Health in Spain and one of the authors of the study explains that “biological and physiological changes in women caused by the menopause come with a greater risk of developing health problems in which diet plays an important role. These include diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.”

Therefore, the analysis of dietary patterns during and after the menopause is of particular interest because of its health implications. However, in Spain there have been very few studies that have assessed the diet of peri- and postmenopausal women.

In order to study these dietary habits, the authors of the study analysed 3574 women from the age of 45 to 68 from October 2007 to July 2008. Each program contained a minimum of 500 women from seven Spanish cities and involved a food frequency questionnaire validated by the Spanish population.

The results show that obesity rates stand at 29% whereas 42% of menopausal subjects are overweight. Average calorie intake was 2053 calories (with 43% of energy intake coming from carbohydrates, 36% from fats and 20% from proteins). Researchers highlight that practically all of the women received the recommended intake of all the vitamins, apart from D and E.

The case of vitamin D is striking given that none of the groups reached 50% of their RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance). The average total intake was 2.14 micrograms per day, which constitutes just 39% of the RDA for women of this age group.

“A diet with less fat and protein that is high in vegetables, nuts, and carbohydrate-rich foods will even out the energy balance and correcs levels of vitamin D and E,” according to the researchers.

Comment from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs:  Women in the pre-menopause and menopause time period can reap many benefits from increasing their intake of vitamin D, calcium and magnesium. These nutrients support the heart and bones, and are also effective remedies for sleeplessness and insomnia.

One insomnia remedy becoming popular among menopausal women is Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com.   Sleep Minerals II contains powerful forms of the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D and zinc.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Valerie H. in Santa Clarita, CA says: “I had such bad menopause insomnia, it took me hours to fall asleep. I also had crawling and tingling feelings in my legs at night.  I got the Sleep Minerals II and after a few days of taking it, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html